All posts by mihlala

For the first time in three decades, an increase in the percentage of unionized workers in Israel

A survey by the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) published last week, found that for the first time in 30 years there has been an increase in the number of unionized workers in the Israeli workforce. According to the survey, 200,000 new workers have unionized since the beginning of the mass wave of labor organizing in 2008; the percentage of unionized workers rose by 2% – from 25% in 2012 (when the last survey on the subject was conducted) – to 27% today.  Considering the rates of retirement and the transition of jobs abroad, the increase in the percentage of unionized workers since 2012 is 5%. The rise of the organized labor is a unique phenomenon to Israel, whereas in the rest of the Western world the trend is reversed.

Between 1995 and 2007, the percentage of unionized workers in Israel dropped as a result of privatization processes, the transition of workers to contracting employment, a change in the structure of the Histadrut (the General Federation of Labour in Israel) and neoliberal government policies. The current wave of unionization, which the CBS survey examines extensively, started in 2008, with the establishment of Koah LaOvdim (Power to the Workers – an Israeli labor union organization) and continued in 2010, when the Histadrut established a new department for unionizing new workers. These processes, along with the 2011 Israeli social justice protests and a precedent-setting ruling from 2012, that established that an employer is forbidden to intervene in the unionization of his employees, resulted in hundreds of new unions joining the workers’ organizations. The new unionized workers come from all sectors of Israeli society and economy: kindergarten teachers, workers of insurance and high-tech companies, security guards, bus drivers, teachers, supportive housing workers and bank employees.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Israel_Housing_Protests_Tel_Aviv_August_27_2011.jpg#filelinks

The survey shows an increase in public support for organized labor. 69% of the workers who are union members say the labor organizations representing them protect employees from arbitrary behaviour of the employers, prevent dismissal and provides legal protection. More than half (56%) of unionized workers are satisfied with the activity of their union. 89% of the public support the workers’ right to unionize and 64% believe that a workplace with a union will have better job security. These findings are consistent with the findings of a survey conducted by “Midgam” for the 2017 May Day conference of the Social Economic Academy, according to which 75% of the public believe that unions reduce social inequality, and 89% view the current wave of unionization as a positive phenomenon.

The increase in the percentage of unionized workers has a positive effect on the entire Israeli society, including non-unionized sectors and workers. The minimum wage in Israel has risen in recent years after years of erosion, and the Gini index, which measures inequality in income distribution, has decreased for the first time in many years. In addition, following an agreement between the Histadrut and the State, over the last two years thousands of workers that were previously employed through contract agencies have been hired directly by the state.

Rami Hod, the executive director of the Berl Katznelson Educational Center and the Social Economic Academy, referred to the findings of the survey: “The Israeli society, which was built on the foundations of organized labor, is returning to its roots, and shows renewed confidence in the unions. The unions give back: beyond the obvious concern to their own members, they work to help all workers in the Israeli economy. We still have a lot of work to do, but it is obvious that this massive current wave of unionization, with 200,000 new unionized workers in the last decade, is the most important and profound social change taking place in Israel. ”

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Demonstration_against_the_housing_prices_in_Haifa_30.7.2011_-_Yitshak_Garden,_Ahuza_(10).JPG

Why American Jews Need to Break Their ‘Apolitical’ Taboo and Start Collaborating with the Israeli Left

Rami Hod, Haaretz – Opinion, Published on July 11, 2017

Move on from your outrage on the Wall. To really change Israel, the Left must win power. That means you breaking your ‘apolitical’ taboo and supporting it

 

The freezing of the agreement to establish a shared prayer space at the Western Wall is a severe blow to the accepted values of most American Jews. Nevertheless, Israeli citizens, politicians and social activists are apathetic about the cancellation of the agreement, in the same way they were apathetic to the decision about making it.

In recent years Israelis have held mass demonstrations against giving our natural resources to a handful of oligarchs. We have held rallies for free public pre-K education and won. Two hundred thousand Israeli workers have joined unions as part of an unprecedented revival of the labor movement taking place in the country since 2008. But the protests and prayers of Women of the Wall have never achieved a similar public effect.

We need a frank discussion about this gap between Israeli indifference and American Jewish outrage. Not because it’s surprising, but because despite both sides recognizing it, there’s still an assumption a rightwing Israeli government will embrace political change contrary to its nature. And why would it?

A dose of hard reality is in order. The Israeli Reform and Conservative communities are politically weak. Their concerns rank at the bottom of priorities for left and center parties.

And only few members of Israeli city councils, communities and social organizations take part in their just struggle. Why, bearing all this in mind, would someone think it is possible to rise above the internal power relations in Israel and accomplish something?

Two explanations are generally given as to why. First is the government’s need for amicable relations between Israel and American Jews. Namely, the government will placate the Jewish diaspora by upholding its values. Secondly, and more cynically, the threat of American money – or withholding it. Our American uncles will stop sending us money if we cross them. It’s hard to completely dismiss these arguments. Still, it’s rather strange to think that one side can convince the other something is black when they see it as white.

So why did liberal American Jews think that the agreement would be implemented in the first place? And similarly, why do some of their leaders continue to believe Netanyahu’s hollow promises to work for a two-state solution?

The key to an answer is hidden in the strategy guiding a considerable part of the institutions of liberal American Judaism in attitudes towards Israel. The formula is simple: conservative American Jews support the Israeli right while liberal American Jews support Israel. Not the Israeli left, but Israel. As Mikhael Manekin wrote, some progressive American Jews don’t think the Israeli left exists. And if it does, it has no strategy on how to change Israel and no chance of winning.

However, conservative American Jews support the Right’s educational program, pre-military academies, Torah settlement groups, think tanks and public campaigns. The American Jewish right and Israeli rightwing are synchronized in their objective to influence Israel’s power relations, to win the war of ideas, and to strengthen a political camp and its institutions.

Liberal Jews, however, are do-gooders. They “strengthen social cohesion in Israel,” “advance a vibrant civil society,” and “create dialogue between the various tribes” in the spirit of President Reuven Rivlin’s diagnosis.

But one taboo undergirds these shibboleths: liberal American Jews can’t be political. The Reform movement, liberal federations and various liberal-leaning foundations can’t be perceived as partisan on Israeli politics or as supporting organizations with a certain political agenda. There are certainly exceptions like the New Israel Fund and some family foundations, but though liberal Jewish organizations are politically engaged in the United States, they remain Apolitical in their action in Israel. The annulment of the Kotel agreement proves that is a mistake.

The lesson is clear: Liberal American Jews need to give up on the faith a rightwing government ruled by rightwing ideology will advance anything resembling a two-state solution, social justice or Jewish pluralism. It just won’t happen. No matter how many government ministers attend Reform movement conferences. Or if Conservative Judaism helps build community centers in the Israeli periphery.

It won’t happen because to really change Israel, the Israeli left must win power. And for the Israeli left to win, we must build a political civil society, not one that serves as a provider of social services the government privatizes, or merely advocates abstract values of solidarity and partnership between peoples. We need a civil society with think tanks, pre-military academies, educational programs, journals, local communities, unions and campaigns- all working to promote progressive solutions and to build power. Just like the rightwing does in partnership with conservative American Jews.

The shameful cancellation of the Kotel agreement is certainly a step backward. But it’s also an opportunity. Liberal American Jews must exchange moral outrage that falls on deaf ears with new, more daring and explicitly political strategy. Only then will we move forward in strengthening our shared values and build a truly effective progressive movement both in Israel and in the United States.

Rami Hod is the Executive Director of the Berl Katznelson Educational center and the director of the Social Economic Academy (SEA) in Israel. Twitter: @Rami_Hod

Rami Hod – Executive Director

Holds a BA from Haifa University’s program for Social-Economic History and Sociology, and an MA in Sociology from Ben Gurion University in the Negev, with his research focusing on education policy in Israel. Prior to joining SEA, Rami worked for five years at Koach LaOvdim -a democratic Workers’ Organization which represents about 25,000 workers from a variety of fields. Rami was the organization’s first paid employee with its establishment, serving a pivotal role in developing its professional and organizational structure, as well supervising budding organizations. In the past he coordinated a scholarship program at Haifa University for jewish and arab students involved in community  organizing and social change in impoverished communities. Rami is a  lecturer and a regular commentator and publicist in Israel’s newspapers and journals on topics of social policy, inequality and social change.

Rafi Kamhi – Program Director, Leadership Development Program for Labor Leaders

Born, raised and currently resides in Haifa with his family. From the first graduates of the Teuda seminary for developing leadership in Judaism, community and social justice, and currently a teacher at the seminary. One of the founders of the Dor Shalom (Generation of Peace) organization, former northern campaign manager for One Israel party during the 1999 national elections, and that of the Green Movement in 2009. Took part in of the groundbreaking struggle of Haifa Chemical workers in 2011, which led to a change in the factory’s employment process. Coordinates and works with budding workers’ organizations; a group facilitator, community organizer with a focus on education and welfare. Founder of the Worker Films Festival in Haifa.

Omer Feitelson – Program Director, Progressive Economists Program

An economist with experience in working with the Israeli public sector and with conducting research in the public policy. Omer holds an MA degree in Public Policy and a BA in PPE (Philosophy, Political Science and Economics), both from the Hebrew University and both with Cum Laude honors. His thesis concerning moral hazard and unemployment went on to be mentioned in both ‘The Marker’ newspaper and the Van leer magazine. Omer had a chance to learn how government works from the inside while working during his time in the university in the Ministry of Environmental Protection and later in the Israeli Employment Service. After graduating he went on to work in consulting firms where he was involved in various public sector projects, involving tasks such as policy research, formulation and evaluation.

Lessons from America: How teachers’ unions can mobilize for public education \ Talila Eylon

During April 2016, a group of Israeli teachers, who are taking part in a leadership program for labor leaders of the Social Economic Academy (SEA), toured the U.S. as part of an immersion program put together by the  American Federation of Teachers (AFT). During the tour, Israeli teacher leaders held work sessions with representatives from the AFT.  Among those participating in the tour was Talila Eylon, one of the founders and leaders of the Hila Program  teachers’ union. The Hila Program is the last educational opportunity for at-risk youths, who have dropped out of Israel’s public education system. Some 1600 teachers work with some 8000 youths.

The first impression one gets from the AFT is its sheer magnitude and power. The American Federation of Teachers, as its name suggests, is a federation of local organizations in the different states and major cities across the U.S. The AFT unions serves as a labor union not only for teachers, but for all ‘para-educational’ workers, like school nurses. We met with representatives from New York’s United Federation of Teachers and from the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. The main issue addressed in our work tour was teachers’ unions’ attempts to battle the privatization of the U.S. education system.

One of the central aspects of the privatization of the education system in the U.S was the formation of a new type of school called Charter School. Ironically, the logic behind these schools was first outline by former AFT president and leader – Albert Shanker, who envisaged an experimental school in which the teaching staff enjoyed full autonomy over school policy to better advance students’ education. Today, this idea is long gone and the public education system is now a vocal critic and advocate against charter schools, which go largely unregulated, except when they need to renew their ‘charter’ – or license – once every five years. The most grievous claim raised against such schools is that their funding comes at the expense of publicly run schools, mortally depleting the poorer public schools of their financial lifeblood. Moreover, though public funding is contingent on the school being open to all potential students, over the years charter schools have developed methods to become elitist and selective, at times even expelling students who threaten their success rates.

with UFT hosts at NY Public school
with UFT hosts at NY Public school

When charter schools are examined from the perspective of worker rights, it becomes evident that most teachers in these schools are not organized and that any attempts to unionize them are quashed or strongly discouraged schools’ management.  Moreover, because these schools are largely free from public supervision , they are free to employ as teachers even those without the required training, for example,  graduate students or academics, hiring and firing them solely at the administration’s will. The AFT is now investing its resources in trying to unionize the teachers at these institutions, and made a strategic choice to employ specially dedicated full time labor organizers for this purpose, something almost inconceivable in Israel.

The level of professionalism and dedication these labour organizers bring to the task of unionizing left a strong impression on members of our delegation. The process of unionization is clearly defined and each stage of it is outlined in advance, with clear criteria for evaluation and follow up: from the decision to unionize and up until the signing of a collective agreement and even afterwards. While learning about this impressive workflow I could not but be amazed at the success of the HILA teachers’ union, whose leaders had to learn the unionization process on the fly, as we progressed. Though much professional aid was received from our organizers , there is much to be learned from the sheer  professionalism and organizational resources we saw in New York, and it should serve as a model for future unionization processes in Israel.  

An additional aspect of unions’ work, which could be of benefit to us, is their partnership with different organizations and bodies active in and around the school system, for example, partners-teachers associations, which are even given an office on the school premises and have a full time representative tasked with community outreach. In neighborhoods with a high percentage of immigrants, these associations even offer educational opportunities and at times health care to poorer parents. Additional partnerships initiated for the schools’ benefits were with local religious leaders and organizations of faith (Jewish, Christian and Muslim). In my opinion, the most important lesson that can be learnt from these projects was the community’s ability to act  together around a common goal, agreeing to put aside and ignore controversial and divisive issues which are predominantly irrelevant to the educational issues at hand. We saw a beautiful and impressive example of such cooperation in our meeting with the Congregation Rodeph Shalom
in Philadelphia.

With UFT hosts
With UFT hosts

As part of their support for Clinton’s presidential bid, members of the AFT also canvass poorer neighborhoods in search of potential minority voters, far from the affluent and white central Philadelphia. I must admit that upon entering an all-black neighborhood, where we joined AFT canvassers,  I was initially somewhat apprehensive, and felt the necessity to ask our guide, herself an African American woman, if it was safe for us to be present there. She quickly reassured us that we had nothing to fear. This experience, of being the only non-black in a poor black neighborhood highlighted for me how economic stratification falls along racial line in America and how, despite claims of prosperity by its capitalism, income gaps and economic inequality run rampant.

One of the more important meetings we held during our visit was with the president of the AFT, Randi Weingarten, who initiate our work tour together with the Social economic academy. Weingarten, a true friend of Israel and a significant partner in our common struggle for a more just Israeli society, ended our meeting with a firm request that we continue our struggle for social justice in Israel, promising to follow up on our activities and monitor our development.

Meeting with professionals from the field of labor organization, rich with experience of successful struggles for unionization, reinforced my belive that a successful labor struggle is possible only when the majority of the respective workers are dedicated to and involved in the process, and that its leaders should, and indeed must demand such involvement by them. More than anything, this tour taught us what we mustn’t allow happen in Israel: wild and irresponsible privatization of the education system, instead of improving and advancing the existing public one. The creative and powerful struggle the AFT leads against privatization in education and the positive actions it takes to strengthen the public system and partner with communities, exposed us to important tools for our continued efforts in Israel.

Talila Eylon

May 2, 2016

 

SEA’s first annual conference draws crowd of over 500

Our annual conference was a resounding success! More than 500 attendees came to hear 41 panelists. Lawmakers, public officials, labor leaders, city council members, heads of NGOs, journalists and activists came together to discuss both the challenges and successes of the movement for social justice in Israel.

We opened the conference with a presentation of the results of a survey conducted into Israelis’ positions on social-economic issues. The survey showed that since 2011 Israelis increasingly take more progressive social and economic positions: the right of of workers in new industries to organize and bargain collectively, a fairer division of income and capital and expansion of the welfare state. The survey’s results can be seen here in an interview with SEA’s director Rami Hod (Walla! Hebrew).

We held round table discussions about the contemporary social and economic trends in Israel and forged new partnerships for the future. During the conference we discussed not only the challenges but also major successes: since 2008, over 150,000 new workers from all over the country have formed unions, making Israel one of the very few countries whose labor movement is growing; parents’ campaigns to have the state provide compulsory education for three year olds and increase the number of teaching aides in preschools; mass protests that forced the government to fix unconstitutional aspects of the natural gas deal; and halting the privatization of Israel’s public health services. Meanwhile, people are increasingly dedicated to social justice, be it local communities improving their self-organizing capabilities or  lawmakers embracing progressive issues. The 2011 social justice protest has spurred people from all  socio-economic and cultural backgrounds  to join in the fight for a juster, more equal economy and society in Israel.

Here is a selection of pictures from the conference. We invite you to see the full album here as well as a 4 minute-long video clip about the conference.

האולם בבית דני היה מלא עד אפס מקום.
The main hall in  south Tel Aviv was packed with over 500 attendees.

רמי הוד, מנכ"ל המכללה, פתח את הכנס והציג את תוצאות הסקר שערכה המכללה עבור האחד במאי.

Rami Hod, SEA’s director general, opens the conference by highlighting the progressive camp’s achievements and the challenges it still faces in the struggle for social justice in Israel.

For Rami’s full speech (in Hebrew)

ח"כ שלי יחימוביץ' דיברה על ההישגים החברתיים-כלכליים של השנים האחרונות ועל האתגרים הרבים בהמשך הדרך.
MK Shelly Yachimovich (Labor Party) spoke about the political and social challenges of the progressive movement.
הפאנל המרכזי בכנס- רוית הכט (הארץ) הנחתה. ח"כ פרופ' יוסי יונה ופרופ' יובל אלבשן התווכחו (באווירה טובה ומכבדת) עם העיתונאית מירב ארלוזרוב ועם עו"ד דן כרמלי, מנכ"ל איגוד לשכות המסחר.
Central panel: Ravit Hecht (Haaretz Daily Newspaper), moderator; MK Prof. Yossi Yona (Zionist Union) and Prof. Yuval Elbashan (Ono Academic College) debate social and economic policies with the journalist Merav Arlosoroff (TheMarker, financial supplement of daily national newspaper Haaretz.) and Dan Carmel, head of the Chamber of Commerce Union.
אחד מארבעת השולחנות העגולים בכנס עסק בשאלה- מהם הרעיונות החברתיים-כלכליים שצריכים לקדם בישראל 2016. גיא פדה, יו"ר הועד המנהל של המכללה, הנחה את השולחן המרתק.
Round table discussion on what main social ideas need to be advanced in 2016.
אבי יאלו, המנכ"ל הנכנס של ארגון הל"ה, ועדי פלד, ממובילות המאבק נגד מתווה הגז.
Avi Yallo, head of the educational group Parents for Education in the Periphery , and Adi Peled, one of the key activists in the campaign against Israel’s natural gas framework deal.
בוגרי הקורס "חרדים למדינה" של פולי-תקווה, בהובלת מיכל צ'רנוביצקי ורמי לבני, השתתפו גם הם בכנס.
Graduates of our program with Ultra orthodox communities among the attendees.
שולחן עגול בנושא האם דור המחאה החברתית מצליח לקדם שינוי חברתי-כלכלי בישראל? צליל אברהם (מאקו) הנחתה.
Round table discussion about the impact of the 2011 Israeli social justice protests in shaping public discourse.
האם המגזר הציבורי בישראל משנה את פניו ומקדם החלטות טובות יותר? את השולחן העגול בנושא הנחה מיקי פלד (כלכליסט). בתמונה- ראונק נאטור, מנכ"לית שותפה של עמותת סיכוי, ניר קידר-סמנכ"ל לתכנון אסטרטגי וכלכלי במשרד הבריאות, ודניאלה גרא-מרגליות, רכזת תחבורה במשרד האוצר. ברקע- מעין ספיבק וניב בן יהודה, סטודנטים במחזור ב' של התוכנית לכלכלנים חברתיים.
Round table discussion on whether the Israeli public sector is changing for the better.
 מהי הבשורה שמביא גל התאגדויות העובדים לחברה הישראלית? יאיר טרצ'יצקי, יו"ר ארגון העיתונאים, הנחה את השולחן בהשתתפות חברי כנסת, מומחים ושלושה מנהיגי עובדים - גד רביד, יו"ר ועדעובדי סאפ, אנגדאו יעקב- ממובילי מאבק עובדי מוקדי הקליטה של יוצאי אתיופיה בישראל, רסמיה זבידאת- ממנהיגות איגוד מטפלות המשפחתונים.
Round table discussion on the impact of the the surge in renewed unionization in Israeli society? Yair Tarchitsky, chairman of the Union of Journalists in Israel, moderated a discussion among different labor leaders: Gad Ravid, chairman of the Workers Council at SAP Labs Israel; Angadu Yaakov, Chairperson of the Workers’ Committee of at the Ethiopian immigration absorption centers, Rasmiya Zavidat, Chairperson of the Preschool Caregivers union, and others.
 מיכאל ביטון, ראש מועצת ירוחם ותומר לוטן, מנכ"ל המרכז להעצמת האזרח, שניים מהדוברים בכנס.
Michael Biton, head of the Yeruham Regional Council, and Tomer Lotan, Director-General of the Center of Citizen Empowerment, addressing the conference.
חברי תנועת הבוגרים של השומר הצעיר שהצטרפו אלינו לכנס.
A group of Shomer HaTzair youth movement alumni who attended the conference.

Our first annual conference has been an excellent starting point for future joint ventures among community and labor leaders, Members of the Knesset, local leaders and academics. In the following years, we will continue to discuss together the successes and challenges facing the social movement in Israel as well as how we can work together to strengthen grassroots level engagement and promote economic and social justice, thereby helping all our citizens, men and women, Jewish and Arab, secular and religious, realize a better life.

Listen to an audio podcast with Rami Hod

Rami Hod, Executive Director of the Social Economic Academy (SEA), talked about Building Constituencies for the Israeli progressive movement, as part of the podcast series hosted by the Partners for Progressive Israel (PPI).

Rami spoke about a “quiet revolution” taking place in Israel in the past few years. Israelis from diverse cultural backgrounds are demanding a fairer economy and society and more participatory democracy. The revival of an active public sphere has begun to make inroads, most notably the huge increase in union membership.

To listen to the audio podcast

 

The Social Economic Academy (SEA) partners with the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) to train Israeli teachers on social justice

SEA’s Leadership Development for Labor Leaders Program seeks to inspire and educate a new generation of labor leaders in Israel. The program promotes worker rights issues and develops grassroots leadership, providing the tools and knowledge to labor leaders from different professions and organizations. Over the course of ten days, April 10-20, the AFT is hosting a delegation of four teachers from Israel who are taking part in SEA’s leadership program. The delegation will visit several AFT projects in New York and Philadelphia, experiencing first-hand its campaigns against privatization of public services in education, efforts to improve public education and to promote activism and political participation in the public sphere.

The delegation is headed by Rafi Kamhi, the director of the Leadership Development Program and one of the leading labor organizers in Israel. Rafi helped found the Dor Shalom (Generation of Peace) organization, ran programs for young people aimed at revitalizing the values of democracy, social justice and tolerance following the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin ; organized the longest strike in Israel’s history, which led to a change in the employment process at Haifa Chemicals in 2011; and established the Workers’ Film Festival in his home town Haifa, now in its ninth year.

The call for participation published by the SEA
The call for participation published by the SEA

A few words on the members of the delegation. Two of the participants are a part of a new teachers movement that arose following the 2011 Israeli social justice protests and promotes teachers assuming greater influence on educational policy, and in particular promotion of tolerance, pluralism and equality in the curriculum. The other two are veteran educators have been leading the fight against the outsourcing of public school services in Israel. One of them is Lily Ben-Ami. Lily has been mobilizing her colleagues to oppose contracting out teachers. In her words, “the struggle for fair employment of teachers in Israel is part of a wider struggle for a more just Israeli society. The more social organizations deal with the everyday problems of Israelis, be it in the workplace, the community or educational system, we will be able to exert far more influence on society as a whole and increase the power of the progressive camp. We hope that the tools we will acquire during our training with AFT will serve us well back in Israel.”

Lily Ben-Ami speaks at a teachers demonstration in Jerusalem
Lily Ben-Ami speaks at a teachers demonstration in Jerusalem

Commenting on the new partnership with AFT, Rami Hod, the Executive Director of the Social Economic Academy, stated that “in the past few years, Israeli society has witnessed a dramatic expansion of union membership and organization. Over 180,000 workers from different industries and various classes have joined trade unions. This is part of a growing movement for social justice that is slowly changing the face of Israeli society. On my recent visit to the US, I was delighted that AFT wanted to help our Leadership Development Program and share its professional knowledge with activist teachers from Israel. AFT President Randi Weingarten is a true friend of Israel and a significant partner in our common struggle for a more just Israeli society. Our partnership with AFT binds us Israeli and American progressives to a common vision as well as common challenges. This will also help us build a new alliance of progressives from Israel and the US, an alliance based on shared learning and development of skills that will strengthen the progressive camp in both countries. We are delighted with the partnership and look forward to its expansion in the coming years.”

Upon their return to Israel, the four participants will apply the newly acquired skills to promote social and economic justice in their schools and communities, a step toward creating a more progressive society in Israel.

20th year since the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin- What should the Progressive camp Do?

Article by Rami Hod, SEA’s Director, and Mikhael Menekin, the director of “Molad”. Originally published in Haaretz

After the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin exactly 20 years ago, Israel’s two major political camps emerged with very different conclusions. Members of the left felt, as one of Rabin’s supporters famously put it, that the state had been “stolen” from them. The right, on the other hand, decided to become the state. The contrasting approaches explain much about Israel today.

The right wing, comprised of some secular ideologists and a large group of religious and messianic activists, was shocked by how close Israel had come to ceding territory to the Palestinians in the Rabin years. They realized that the only way to prevent the division of Greater Israel, and the rise of the next Rabin, was not to protest but to actively shape the state in their own image. “The eternal nation does not fear a long journey,” once a nationalist slogan sung during provocative marches through Arab areas of east Jerusalem, became the motto for persistent, daily work aimed at building a well-organized and broad political camp. The right did not tailor its positions to flatter the public – instead, it created mechanisms for influencing public opinion and joined powerful existing institutions. The public sector, the media, and the military, once the stronghold of the old elites, became seen by the right as tools it could use to impact the Israeli mainstream.

But that wasn’t all. The right also created independent institutions that began working together to promote shared goals. Research institutes such as Shalem College, the Institute for Zionist Strategies, and the Kohelet Policy Forum, were formed as intellectual hothouses for economic and political conservatism. Dozens of military preparatory programs appeared, aimed at training teens to think in terms of “us” and “them.” Small groups of committed religious activists known as garinim toranim (literally, “seeds of Torah”) scattered throughout Israel and began engaging in educational and community activities. All of these put down roots in Israeli society and grew to form the foundation of the political Right. The organized push to sign up new members of the Likud Party in order to affect leadership elections and policy from the inside, and the transformation of the old and narrow National Religious Party into an “all-Israeli” party with a new name, Jewish Home – these were the parliamentary expression of the same fundamental move. These moves, coupled with a clear ideology and pride, created an effective political camp.

The left, reeling from the loss of its leader in 1995 and the loss of power in the election of 1996, took the opposite approach. Instead of fighting for the character of the state and for the heart of the public, its activists turned to tapping the many business opportunities created by the Oslo Accords, and to founding well-meaning progressive minded NGOs that avoided institutional political affiliation. The left wing, lacking an effective leader, looked on as the Labor movement’s institutions crumbled before its eyes and slid into ideological stagnation. The left stopped establishing educational and social ventures, and spiraled into confusion about the way forward. Some parts of the left ended up adopting the basic premises of the right – that there is no partner for peace on the Palestinian side, that the Zionist project was messianic to begin with, and that the far-right approach to economics was best. Others parted ways with the Israeli public, sure of their ideology but contemptuous towards the rest of society.

As a result, the leading part of the left, Labor, repeatedly joined unity governments as the junior partner of the right, further speeding the left’s fall from grace as an ideological and governmental alternative. Many Israeli academics gave up trying to influence Israeli society. The intellectual hobby of deconstructing political positions, along with a growing conviction that the entire left wing in Israel, past and present, is neither worthy nor essentially different from the right, led to a drop in the number of publicly active left-wing intellectuals seeking answers for the fundamental questions facing Israeli society.

While the right built a political camp working to win over the public, the left built energetic civil society organizations with little impact on the mainstream and with an ethos of seeking compromise with the right. While the right adopted the classic modus operandi of Israel’s Labor movement – the gradual and persistent conquest of “one acre at a time” – in the public sector and in local and national politics the left had no plan at all.

Even the most determined of the post-Rabin left-wingers failed to consistently pursue long-term goals as the right was doing. A good example is Dor Shalom, “Peace Generation,” a movement founded hours after Rabin’s assassination, which engaged in educational projects and election campaigns. The movement evaporated within several years after its leaders took up private business ventures. Its core members, initially devoted to change, grew into caricatures of crony capitalism. Founding member Rafi Barzilay became an advisor to the hawkish Avigdor Lieberman, coining the anti-Arab slogan “No loyalty – no citizenship.” Tal Silberstein, another of the founders, became a servant to the highest-paying political master. Erez Eshel, who led a famous student strike in 1998, migrated to the far right.
When the left’s ethos of globalization and desire for reconciliation with its opponents met the right wing’s mission-driven ethos, the victory of the latter was overwhelming.

The silent majority in Israel – which, in contrast with the common left-wing assumption, is pragmatic and moderate – followed the camp that displayed more belief, confidence, and effort. It followed the largely religious, ideological right whose attempt to become synonymous with the state worked well enough to cause many to believe that was true.

In the last decade, and especially since the large social protests of 2011, change has begun to seep into the basic assumptions and activities of those wish to continue Rabin’s legacy. Essentially a generational shift, this subterranean movement has yet to be translated into a broad national and political force. Members of Israel’s third generation, and especially young supporters of the two-state solution, of a fair economy, and of civil equality, are realizing that political change takes place through institutions and policy making. These young adults are joining the public sector in larger numbers than ever before in order to shape policy; they are forming labor unions on an unprecedented scale, reviving organized labor as a crucial institution for minimizing social inequality; they are building new Zionist and humanist pre-military volunteer frameworks and preparatory programs; they are fighting to add a second teaching assistant in preschools and reduce classroom crowding, and have already won free state education from age 3, changing the face of public education; they are challenging security paradigms; and they are entering parliament, having gradually accepted that change requires political work. Although sporadic, all these steps are positive.

They indicate a shift away from the previous generation, which failed to oppose the right’s mission to change Israeli society, abandoned the “we” in favor of “me,” and gave up the struggle for the future of the Zionist project. Today’s young left-wingers understand that they must move on from the trauma of having the country “stolen” and fight seriously, every day, for the country they want.

Twenty years after Rabin’s assassination, it’s time to offer a real alternative to the discouraging claims that the right won because the public believes in right-wing ideas, because of Netanyahu’s campaign skills, or because of the personality of the current opposition leader. These arguments not only overlook the right’s skillful institutional work, but also evade the most important question: What should we do now?

The answer: We must rebuild Rabin’s political camp. The left needs to construct institutions spanning civil society and politics; it needs representatives in the public sector who know state systems from the inside; and it needs an appealing ethos and clear ideas. Only then can the left can regain public trust – and achieve political victory.

Rami Hod is Executive Director of the Social Economic Academy
Mikhael Manekin is Executive Director of Molad – the Center for the Renewal of Israeli Democracy

An international student call for pluralism in economics- Sea’s progressive economists program going global

“Economic Students Forum”, which has been active since 2007 in Haifa University under the oversight of the SEA, has joined an international network of economics students campaigning for pluralism within economics.The international student initiative for pluralism in economics is a collaboration of 65 associations of economics students from 30 countries around the world, all work together to create pluralism in economics studies. The initiative is part of Rethinking Economics – an international network of students campaigning for pluralism within economics, particularly the economics curriculum, which is, at present, heavily biased towards the methods of the neoclassical school.“Economic Students Forum”, which has been active since 2007 in Haifa University under the oversight of the SEA, has recently joined the initiative. Along with groups from USA, Sweden, Germany, India and more, The Haifa students took a central role in writing the open letter which received wide media coverage all over the world.For the open letter- An international student call for pluralism in economicsIn the end of June, The students participated at the Rethinking Economics london conference at the University of London, featured keynote speeches from Lord Adair Turner and Dr. Ha-Joon Chang, plus over twenty other speakers, including Prof. Victoria Chick, Prof. David Tuckett and Will Hutton. Throughout the two-day conference , student groups from around the world have explored both the problems with the current system and, more positively, alternatives to the status quo. The “Economics Students Forum” is an initiative of Israeli economics students from the University of Haifa, founded in 2007 under the supervision of the Social Economic Academy. The forum seeks to stimulate the economics discourse at the universities, to expose students to economic issues relevant to Israeli society, and to give them a better understanding of the economic world. The forum is motivated by the growing criticism being sounded both in Israel and abroad, regarding the way economics is being taught, and thus tries to promote a pluralist and interdisciplinary pedagogy of economics in the universities As a major part of the “Economics Students Forum” at Haifa University’s activities, the forum offered students a non-academic course throughout the second semester of their studies. At this course the students were exposed to the significant role economics has on everyday life, learned to expand the available methodologies, and challenged the current solutions being modeled and taught. In the semester preceding the course, the forum’s leaders hold a social-economic workshop ( “Beit Midrahsh”) conducted by the head of the northern branch of SEA.

We’re here for the long run – A few words ahead of the elections by Rami Hod, SEA director

The upcoming elections bring with them a real opportunity for change in social and economic policy in Israel.

As a grassroots organization, every day we encounter over-crowded classrooms, a severe crisis in Israel’s health services and devalued wages. These are all results of the power relations between competing sets of ideas and the social and political organizations behind them. Therefore, We attribute the utmost importance to voting and taking an active role in these elections in an attempt to put social and economic issues at the heart of Israel’s public discourse.

But be assured- the struggle for social Justice is not one that ends on March 17th – election day. This struggle needs to be waged wisely and with a long term plan in mind. After many years during which the social discourse was marginalized and neo-liberal ideology ruled supreme as the only viable policy, we are witnessing real change. Increasing public criticism at the unholy coupling of politics and big money; winning campaigns against the privatization of national health services, for raising the minimum wage and against the monopoly over Israel’s national gas reserves; initiatives like the attempt to form Israel’s first cooperatively owned bank; and Over 100,000 workers who have unionized since 2011 and changed the labor market.

As a school for social change established in 2004, a time of dramatic cuts in social services and public indifference, we find inspiration and hope in wake of these recent changes, which reaffirm our belief in hard work. But building a progressive welfare state will not happen overnight in the course of a single election or even two. Building a social movement that works to promote equality and social justice within local communities, in the education system, in the labor market and in both local and national politics, with a solid ideological foundation, practical policy solutions, widespread support and cadres of dedicated activists, is the only way to make substantial progress.

In contrast to the past, we can say with pride that this movement exists in Israel and that it already making many significant strides. Still, much work remains to be done, to spread progressive values and people focused ideas and practices among local communities, students, youth and and workers across the country.

These elections provide the perfect opportunity to re-engage in political involvement and to achieve policy change. But if we truly want to implement a long term strategy, we must remember that an effective political force whose goal is promoting social change can only grow if large portions of the Israeli public demand it. Therefore, the important work is the one done in between elections, through the creation of local groups together for change all year round.

In the days that remain until we go to the ballots, we call on our partners and graduates to take an active part in this election cycle; and the day after the vote, regardless of the results, to continue working for hearts and minds as well as practical change in Israeli society. We at the SEA are here for the long run.

Progressive Economists Program starts its second year

Progressive Economists is the only program of its kind in Israel that educates and trains economists to re-address social issues through economics studies. It’s mission is to develop new economic leadership by training young economists and update economic thinking to encouraging them to develop new ideas and enter into carriers of meaningful change.

1959353_1582221625339545_7870948299069196914_n

35 outstanding economics students from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University and Haifa University receive scholarships from SEA. Their intensive training includes weekly courses on progressive trends in economics to give an emphasis on social impacts on individuals, families and communities. These are given by prominent scholars and government officials. Bolstered by internships in national and local government. The internship provides students with a window into real world economics and encourages them to develop a career in public service and create a change from within.

ipp

Our goal is that a significant number of student leaders move on to meaningful careers in the public service and will lead change in social and economic policy. Others will pursue doctoral degrees at Israeli and internationally renowned universities. We believe the program’s alumni will be tomorrow’s leading economists and decision-makers.

Visit the program’s new website

Students try to fight inequality by diversifying economic studies

With support of the Social Economic Academy, economic students are working to change the curriculum of economics studies in the hopes of creating a new generation of socially minded economists. Originally Published on Ynet, 2.9.2014

Way back in 2007, when Yuval Ofek-Shanny, then a BA student in Haifa University, and his friends first thought up the idea of a forum where economics students could learn topics outside their curriculum, the economic world was very different than it is today. The global financial crisis had yet to erupt, mass protests for social justice were in the distant future and public discourse was still controlled by free-market, trickle-down economics pundits.

Ofek-Shanny, today the proud owner of an MA in economics, says that even then, “economics students were starting to feel that their studies, though well situation in the social sciences faculty, neglected the connection between economy and society, and failed to discuss Israeli society, specifically its economic history and controversies.”

  Forum's students at Haifa University  (Photo courtesy of Social Economic Academy )

Forum’s students at Haifa University (Photo courtesy of Social Economic Academy )

Ofek-Shanny and his friends turned to the Social Economic Academy – a non-profit education and training organization promoting social change, through workshops given by leading academics and social activists – and planted the seed of the first forum where economics students were taught to “think beyond the numbers,” as the forum’s motto says.

Students listen to Prof. Eytan Sheshinski  (Photo courtesy of Social Economic Academy )

Students listen to Prof. Eytan Sheshinski (Photo courtesy of Social Economic Academy )

With the guidance of Rafi Kanhi, the head of the Academy’s northern branch, the forum has since held five courses open to Haifa’s economics students, dealing with topics considered marginal at the time but which are now at the forefront of public debate: privatization, inequality, workers’ unions and co-ops.

Aided by speakers including Prof. Ariel Rubinstein, an Israel Prize laureate and one of the Academy’s founders, Prof. Joseph Zeira from the Hebrew University and Dr. Nili Mark, the forum started to gain momentum, even winning the support of the Haifa University Economics Department.

Prof. Eytan Sheshinski  (Photo courtesy of Social Economic Academy )

Prof. Eytan Sheshinski (Photo courtesy of Social Economic Academy )

 

Since the forum was established, public discourse over economic and social issues has seen some dramatic changes. The causes of social justice and fair distribution of resources are no longer just a rallying call: The economic establishment itself is starting to change as well.

Last January, in the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland (a far cry from Tahrir Square, Rothschild Boulevard or the Occupy Wall Street’s tents in New York) a survey of 700 experts revealed they believed the greatest risk the world is facing is inequality.

At the same time, debate over what is taught and, mainly, what isn’t taught in economics departments became even more prevalent. Dr. Nili Mark, a lecturer with the forum since its inception and the writer of ‘introduction to economics’ textbook, which is widely studied in economics departments, said she has no doubt significant changes must be made to the subject matter.

“For instance,” she explains, “the discussion of market failures must be widely expanded. Identifying instances in which government intervention is justified for economic reasons, not only social reasons, is no less important than understanding the free market, possibly more. Economic history must be taught more thoroughly, and ideological considerations influencing economic policy must be presented.”

“Mainly,” she concludes, “the guiding principle should be that economics doesn’t really stand on its own as a science, but is part of the social sciences.”

Recently, an unprecedented global initiative of 21 economy students groups, including the Haifa forum, called for an overhaul of economics studies, a call which was widely covered by global media:

“Change will be difficult – it always is. But it is already happening. Indeed, students across the world have already started creating change step by step. We have filled lecture theatres in weekly lectures by invited speakers on topics not in the curriculum; we have organized reading groups, workshops, conferences; we have analyzed current syllabuses and drafted alternative programs; we have started teaching ourselves and others the new courses we would like to be taught.

“We have founded university groups and built networks both nationally and internationally. Change must come from many places. So now we invite you – students, economists, and non-economists – to join us and create the critical mass needed for change.”

At the same time as joined with global initiatives, the Haifa forum has also increased its influence and managed to draw about 50 economy students every week to its course on critical economic thought in the second semester of 2014.

Alongside lectures on subjects such as the Nordic Model, privatization and nationalization, and ecological economics, students were taken on a field trip to Jerusalem where they met with Bank of Israel Governor Dr. Karnit Flug, economy journalist Shaul Amsterdamski and the chairman of the Knesset Economic Affairs Committee, Prof. Avishay Braverman.

Students with Bank of Israel Governer Prof. Flug (Photo courtesy of Social Economic Academy )

Students with Bank of Israel Governer Prof. Flug (Photo courtesy of Social Economic Academy )

Ori Rubin, a forum member, said the growing interest in the forum’s activity opened new possibilities. The forum’s primary goal, he explains, is to bring about “real change to the curriculum, knowledge and moral values students will take with them to the job market.”

“We plan to expand the forum’s activity and have a real influence over the economics graduate and over the discourse in those departments,” he says.

“The activity of the forum is part of a deep process taking place in Israel and around the world,” adds Rami Hod, the director-general of the Social Economic Academy. “A growing number of groups are interested in studying the social reality in order to change it, and when the call for change comes from economics students that’s especially promising.

“Those same students will soon work for the public sector where Israel’s economic policy is formed. Some of them will pursue an academic career, becoming the teachers of future generations. Therefore, their ability to question the theories they study and their knowledge of topics missing from the curriculum, like inequality, has the utmost importance.”

Will then economy departments, widely perceived as the hotbeds of capitalism, actually become the locus of change?

Ayala Brilliant

Training director.
Experts in Training : Leadership skills, building political power, community organizing and Volunteers management. Certified Group facilitator, holds an M.A from the IDC in Government, Diplomacy and Conflict resolution. Served as the training director of the V15 campaign, and the leadership program director of One Voice Movement. In her past served as the Jewish Agency representative to Baltimore and the head of the pre-military volunteer project of the Kibbutz Movement.

How the Israeli worker was disenfranchised?

Precarious employment via employment agencies has reached the Israeli middle class. A collection of essays published by the Social Economic Academy offer cures for the malady.

Originally published in Haaretz, 12.8.2013

What do Sonol, the Open University, Pelephone, Cellcom, Clal Insurance, the credit card companies, Shefa Catering, Burgeranch, U-Bank, and a few dozen other companies in a variety of fields have in common? Their employees decided to organize with the Histadrut or with the smaller workers’ organizations, and form a union to represent them against the management. After years of fear and hesitation, many workers – in recent years their numbers have swollen to 60-70 thousand – decided to try and change the terms of their employment. It’s not class warfare, but it’s something.

These attempts at organization were influenced by a myriad of factors. The recession which started in 2008 and gave the employer the upper hand made many employees long for job stability. Protection against arbitrary terminations seems more important today than a pay raise. The increase in violations of workers’ rights, combined with the state’s feebleness in enforcing labor laws, also contributed to the will to organize. Another factor is the many forms of employment in Israel and the flourishing of a particularly precarious one: Contract work, or employment through go-betweens called “employment agencies,” or “service companies.” There are no exact numbers as to how many Israelis are employed by these companies, but estimates place the number at 300-400 thousand, or over 10 percent of salaried employees – well above the average in developed countries.

Therefore, “Precarious Employment: Systematic Exclusion and Exploitation in the Labor Market” is relevant today, and probably will be for many years to come. Precarious employment patterns were not created yesterday, but developed in Israel over decades. Those most exposed to them are immigrants, minorities, migrant workers and, in recent years, a growing portion of middle class Israeli-born citizens. Outsourced employees in general and those employed through agencies in particular are everywhere: In both the public and the private sectors, in retail and in the manufacturing sector, in local municipalities and in government offices. Even the education system, including higher education, has been infected. Precarious employment occurs when the direct or indirect employer deliberately attempts to keep pay or benefits from the employee. It is an attempt to discriminate between employees under a legal guise, or by a flagrant violation of the law, in denial of the employer-employee relationship obligations.

The book’s editors, Dr. Daniel Mishori and Dr. Anat Maor, as well as most of the writers represented in it, have backed workers’ struggles against precarious employment and for workers’ right to organize. The book draws on many examples of exploitation in universities (perhaps because most of the writers are academics themselves), and less on cases of exploitation in factories, municipalities and private businesses.

The first part of the book generally outlines precarious or discriminative employment and links it to privatization. Economist Itzik Saporta claims that in Israel, the administration and the employers both consider what happens in the workplace to be of no importance. The dominant discourse, not only among employers but among the general public as well, is not about terms of employment but about markets, supply and demand, and interests. This discourse paints a picture in which the market allots every employee with what he deserves relative to his contribution to his employer’s profits.

Prof. Itzhak Harpaz claims in his essay that the Israeli job market at the start of the 21st century is reminiscent of the 19th in terms of discrimination and harassment of different sectors of workers, expressed by violation of labor laws and collective agreements. Dr. Efraim Davidi writes that workers were always grouped into opposite types in Israel: First, Israeli workers versus Palestinians, which were later replaced by migrant workers – the principle always being getting cheap labor. Davidi claims the government encourages precarious employment patterns. Anat Maor says that since the 80s, especially between 1997 and 2007, Israeli governments led processes of dismantling organized labor and lowering labor costs, ignoring their duty to defend disenfranchised workers.

Prof. Dani Gutwein links between precarious employment and privatization, which aims at dismantling organized labor in Israel. “Privatization is a political project which serves the interests of capital and is responsible for the dismantlement of the welfare state,” Gutwein writes. “Thereby the middle class’ social security is eroded, while the lower classes are pushed below the poverty line and gaps between different sectors increase.” Prof. Gadi Algazi and Orly Benjamin warn that these processes of privatization and discrimination are currently at work in universities, mostly damaging non-tenure track lecturers and the administrative and custodial staff.

Attorney Itay Svirski, one of the founders of Koach La Ovdim – Democratic Workers’ Organization in 2007, reaches the conclusion that given the lax enforcement of employment norms by the state and by the Histadrut, organized labor and unions are the most effective tool to realize workers’ rights. The writers testify that the pessimism they felt while writing the book has given way to more optimistic feelings, which may be due to a positive trend in 2012, following a new pro-workers legislation package and the 2011 protest movement. It would have been better if the book was not authored only by academics and professional unionizers, but also by politicians and public figures from across the political spectrum, including members of government. Then, the book could have influenced circles outside those which are already aware of the magnitude of the problem of exploiting disenfranchised workers and leaving them out to dry.

Executives can do with less \ Amnon Portugali

Originally published on Ynet, 04.11.13

On November 24, 2013 the citizens of Switzerland will vote in three referendums. One over the “1:12” initiative, which limits the pay of companies’ top executives.Citizens will decide whether to approve an amendment to the Swiss constitution which limits the highest salary in a company to 12 times the lowest salary.

The questions voters will have to answer are: “Are you for the popular initiative ‘1:12 – for fair wage’?” and “Are you for the recommendations of the Federal Council and the parliament?”

The Swiss business world is deeply averse to the initiative, as are the political right and center. The Federal Council and the parliament recommended against it, and it was forecast to be rejected by the referendum. But a poll commissioned by the Swiss public broadcasting company, SSR, and released late October revealed the initiative’s supporters and its opponent are tied at 44%. Previous polls gave supporters only 35%.

In November 2012 in Israel, the Knesset passed a minimalist government bill to limit top executives’ salaries in public companies, based on the Neeman Committee’s recommendations from the previous year. The bill doesn’t limit salaries, but sets provisions according to which salaries would be determined. The bill was passed as an alternative to the private bills sponsored by lawmakers Shelly Yachimovich and Haim Katz, who proposed to limit the salary of top executives in public companies to no more than 50 times that of their lowest paid employee.

The Swiss initiative

In a referendum held on March 3, 2013, the Swiss approved an initiative setting limits to executive salaries in publicly traded companies. The initiative was meant as an amendment to the Swiss federal legislation so that it will, for instance, require an annual vote by shareholders on the total remuneration of the board of directors and executives. It also required companies’ articles of association to include the directors and executives’ bonus schemes and pay plans.

The Swiss also banned advance payments for new executives and severance packages for departing ones, and required an annual vote by shareholders for the president and other members of companies’ board of directors. The initiative also banned corporate proxy and the representation of shareholders by depository banks.

The initiative, which Swiss media termed the “against rip-off salaries” initiative, also banned giving bonuses to executives if the company they head has been taken over by another company, and required loans and pension plans for executives and board of directors members to be more transparent.

In addition, the initiative required pension funds that hold controlling shares of companies to

participate in the aforementioned annual vote for remuneration for top executives. For violating these provisions, the initiative levels criminal sanctions of up to three years imprisonment and a fine of up to six years’ remuneration.

According to the Swiss government, about 2.4 million citizens have cast their vote, some 46% of eligible voters. Some 68% supported the initiative and 32% were opposed, one of the highest rates of support a popular initiative has ever received. The origin of the initiative’s success can probably be traced back to public discontent with the $78 million paid to the chairman of Novartis after his departure and the large bonuses awarded to executives who brought the Swiss bank UBS to near collapse.

Quid pro quo

Wall Street Journal slammed the referendum, saying the Swiss have lost their way by limiting executive remuneration, and that requiring shareholders to vote on these matters is “unnecessary.” If shareholders and investors disapprove of a company’s pay plan, the article argued, they should express their displeasure by voting accordingly or by selling their stock and investing in companies with more conservative and transparent pay plans.

Simply put, if you don’t like the executives’ pay, sell your stock. It’s a common argument which is usually well received, but it is completely opposed to the essence of the corporation. The shareholders are the corporation’s owners, and if the remuneration set by the shareholders or by the state is not to the executives’ liking, it is they who should quit, not the shareholders.

The state awards corporations, especially the public ones, with a variety of legal privileges, grants and tax benefits. The state can and must require corporations to oblige with proper codes of conduct – including limits to executive pay.

We should learn from Switzerland.

The writer is a lecturer at the Social Economic Academy and a researcher at the Center for Social Justice and Democracy at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute.

Noa Richke

“From the moment the the first SEA course opened in 2004, I knew the organization would be able to address a deep-seated need in Israeli society. This is the need for a substantial and critical debate regarding the way we as a society manage ourselves and the tools we require to change our social reality. The SEA allowed many people, myself included, to learn and develop as social activists, and shed light on knowledge usually kept in dark corners. The tools I received from the SEA are still with me today in every project I embark on.”

Ilan Tal Nir

“After leaving my position as manager of city of Givatayim Education Department, I worked as an educational consultant for an organisation called Academia whose goal is to assist youths from the periphery to reach higher-education and took an SEA course on inequality in education. The course had a profound influence on me, and gave me, after years of working in the field, a new perspective on social justice and equality in education.”

Sagit Erel

“As a social activist I felt that despite my faith in social justice and workers rights, activists like myself were still in dire need of knowledge pertaining to rights and their actualization, as well as the manner we can truly aid other organization attempts. Thus, at the beginning of 2014, I put together a course on worker organizations for SEA activists and course participants. The lecturers were top-notch and the interaction with people who had already registered significant gains in this field were inspiring and motivating. After the course, I became active in the field and through the tools I received I began aiding group attempting to fulfil their rights.“

Luni Natanzon

“The SEA represents for me an alternative route to social and economic development in Israel. An alternative front which blends academic thought and field work. I feel that I received many skills from the SEA’s courses in which I participated.”

Michal Zernowitski

“During the last municipal elections (2013) I established a political ticket comprised only of ultra-Orthodox women from the city of Elad. For the first time in Israel, women vied for a seat on a city council of an ultra-Orthodox community. After the elections, a few women talk about how to continue to work together, and we decided to begin a learning process focusing on social issues at the municipal level in an attempt to lead a change in our city. We soon opened a course and workshop program with SEA, in which men and women from different parts of the city can come and learn. The learning experience and the interaction with experienced public activist and community organizers helped us consolidate our group identity, decide what issues we hope to tackle and find inspiration in numerous successes stories.”

Ran Livne

“In the past I helped organize a group of janitors at Tel Aviv University and I was one of the founders of an entrepreneur center at Tel Aviv University; during the tent protests (of 2011) I was responsible for liaising between the Rothschild protest encampment (where the protest leaders were situated) and the National Student Union; I also led the consumers boycott of Shufersal and Tnuva.
“The SEA is one of the most important and inspiring social initiatives in Israel. It connects between knowledge and action, academia and field work. The extent to which the SEA developed my skills and critical-practical thinking is unmatched and I owe SEA much of my success.”

Hayra Alu-Hamra

“The profession of social work is a statement regarding a desire to improve the quality of life of our clients. Following of the courses and training programs I took at the SEA, I understood that without a deep understanding of the organizational and structural relationships in Israeli society, as well as in implementing changes in policy, the role of the social worker will always be lacking.”

Yosef Baruch

“I participated in the SEA’s Co-operative training Program. In my opinion the SEA is a true source for a social change. The content of the SEA teaches is offered in only a few other places in such an organized and structured way. The SEA led to a real shift in consciousness, from passivity to activity.”

Noah Notsani

“Over the years I have always had the feeling something was off, a feeling I did not how to articulate into words. I saw the hardships of Israeli reality, in which people work but remain poor and unacceptable inequality is rampant. I was searching for answers on how to change this situation and when the SEA was established I enrolled in its first course.
“The SEA was the missing piece in my puzzle – it connected between my feelings and the data, showing me that the social reality in Israel is not the result of a force of nature, but of policy – policy which can be changed.
“The combination of the knowledge I gained, the people I met and the skills I developed at the SEA led to to where I am today.”

Tom Dromi Hakim

“I joined the SEA in 2011 through a fellows training course and today I lecture on co-op activity and economy before numerous groups. The SEA has played a pivotal role in expanding the public’s knowledge on social and economic issues and also in changing the face of Israeli society as I see it. The fellow’s program is an amazing way for people like myself to expose divers groups and communities to new and more nuanced understanding of society and economy”. “

Prof. Dana Ron

“I began studying at the SEA when it was first established (in 2004). One of the most extraordinary things the SEA does is bring together a diverse group of people – from different ages and backgrounds – whose common denominator is a real desire to know and understand, and on the basis of this understanding and knowledge, lead social change.”

Union busting won’t help – Israeli workers are organizing in unprecedented numbers

Union busting won’t help – Israeli workers are organizing in unprecedented numbers

Rami Hod’s article on TheMarker, published on 11.8.2015

In recent days many of Israel’s workers will celebrate the two year anniversary of the landmark ruling by Israel’s Labor Court, led by Chief Justice Nili Arad, that decreed that a company’s management is strictly forbidden from intervening or even voicing its opinion about any attempt by workers to unionize. The ruling was promptly followed by a surge in the number of workers’ union.

The last five years witnessed over 120,000 workers join labor unions in Israel. These workers include outsourced teachers, hi-tech workers, cleaning staff, fast food workers, college lecturers, bus drivers, mobile providers’ workers and more. This number is unprecedented, and is the clearest expression and most significant manifestation of the social awakening which began to take over Israel in the protest movement of the summer of 2011.

But this wave of unionization has also sparked a backlash by managements, using new direct and indirect tactics to circumnavigate the labor court’s ruling and sabotage workers’ attempts to organize. One of the most common of such tactics is setting up an in-house or internal union (one not linked to any labor union). These are usually set up by management and is presented outwardly as an authentic workers’ organization.

The labor court is now called to address a suit filed by the works at Menora Mivtachim Holdings (one of Israel’s largest insurance suppliers), that unionized under the auspices of the Histadrut labor federation, and are calling for the court to instruct the company’s management to desist from undermining the union and stop all attempts to set up an internal workers’ union of its own. The question the court now faces will have dramatic implications for the status of Israel’s workers – should the internal union be recognized it would thus grant legimty to the the practice of union busting, a move which would render the initial ruling obsolete.

Unsurprisingly, some have gladly greeted this ‘new’ tactic: Oriel Lynn, the owner of Lynn-Bichler Human Resources and a well known objector to any form of labor unions, recently dubbed the appearance of internal unions a “new ray of light in labor relations in Israel,” adding a recommendation: “Many employers would do well to look into this organizational model, for internal unions free of external power are a positive thing in the field of labor relations.” Lynn was joined by the author Irit Linur, who wrote a tongue-in-cheek post on her popular Facebook page that the internal labor union would be a “shame for the Histadrut to lose 7 million NIS of annual members’ fees, think of all the prime time advertising minutes they could have bought.” The joking being that the internal unions only constitute an economic loss for the allegedly greedy and press-driven labor federations.

The formation of in-house unions are depicted by Lynn and Linur as a struggle for freedom against the stifling and terrible unions. But nothing could be farther from the truth. To understand why a workers’ organization is not possible without the support of a union, we should ask the workers attempting to unionize how their struggle would look without their backing. There is logic behind the Israeli law’s decision to permit only general labor unions, those consolidating workers from different sectors, to sight collective bargaining agreements. They are the only ones that have the experience and ability to do so, giving workers organizational and legal aid against abuse by managements.

The primetime campaign ad that was the butt of Linur’s joke – assumably the “You’re Stronger When You’re Unionized,” actually helped create dozens of new labor unions. Those defamed ‘membership wages’ she quipped about are the only way a union can free itself of big money’s control, give aid to the diverse groups of workers that knock on its door and lead powerful and influential social struggles of solidarity for a higher minimum wage – a struggle that an internal union could not allow itself to participate in.

Organized labor in Israel must be strengthened by the formation of more and more unions, independent of their respective managements and bolstered by labor federations. These are the most important bulwark democratic societies have against the shift of wealth from the many to the few and the most important mechanism to reducing inequality.

Rami Hod is the Director of the Social Economic Academy

Boaz Gur

“During my BA studies I received a National Lottery scholarship for excellence in military service, and that’s how I first met the SEA. As a young student with a newly discovered interest in social change, SEA gave me requisite tools to understand social reality and to change it. During the 2011 social protests, I organized the forum of the northern protest encampments, and during the 2013 municipal elections I ran for Haifa city council and was in charge of community organizing for “Living in Haifa” movement. Over the years, I have always stayed part of the SEA, coordinating courses and training workshops, because I understand that only daily connect between studying and doing can lead to a change at both the national and local level.”

Prof. Arnon Brown

A professor of social worker and head of the Human Services Department at the Tel Hai Academic College. Holds a BA in Political Science and an MA in Social Work from the Hebrew University. Wrote his doctorate work at Bristol University (UK) and has since taught social work at Haifa University, Hebrew University, Hong Kong and Botswana (Africa). An expert in social policy with a focus on poverty, and social and community work.

Tamar Shchory (Lawyer)

Tamar is a Vice President in the World Jewish Congress, the international representative body of Jewish communities and organizations in nearly 100 countries.

Tamar is a social activist promoting social justice and gender equality and is currently a leading member in various socio-economic forums.

In previous positions, Tamar has served as the Chairperson of the Ben Gurion Student Association, followed by a term as the Chairperson of the World Union of Jewish Students (WUJS). Tamar was also a director in the Israeli office of UNICEF and the director of Academia and International Students Affairs in the Tel Aviv-Yafo Global City initiative.

Tamar has BA in Politics and Government and the Studies of the State of Israel from Ben Gurion University of the Negev, MA in Law from Bar Ilan University and a BA in Law from the Netanya Academic College.

Promising Economists

Rationale and Goals
In wake of the 2008 financial crisis, criticism of the curriculum and agenda of economics studies rose significantly, both in Israel and around the world. Despite the fact that economics is included under the social sciences, de facto it is taught as an exact science. As a result, people have grown increasingly skeptical of economic science as a tool to address the everyday problems they face. It seems that the prevalent economic model being taught is increasingly losing touch with reality. Thus in Israel, though our economy is supposedly growing and considered stable, the taxpayer is faced with growing inequality, rising cost of living prices and an at times obtuse echelon of professional economists. This program attempts to rethink the manner the science of economics is taught by enriching the curriculum so that it supplies a broader spectrum of models and perspective, more complex and rooted in reality. The program’s target audience is economics students and it aims to create a new, more socially conscious, generation of economists who graduated from their studies with a deeper understanding of society, economy and their interfaces. The program offers both a 10-12 meeting enrichment course conducted on a semestral basis and aid for graduates in integrating into the public and private sectors. The course will be given by leading academics and economic thinkers from both the public and private sector and will also host a more intimate discussion group to form what we call a social-economic “Biet Midrash” (discussion workshop).
Economics Students Forum at Haifa University
The program is based on the activities of the Economic Students Forum at Haifa University, which has been active since 2007, led by students at the local economics department and with the supervision of the SEA. The forum seeks to stimulate the economics discourse at the universities, to expose students to economic issues relevant to Israeli society, and to give them a better understanding of the economic world. The forum is part of a an international initiative of economics students from around the world (France, UK, Germany, US, Brazil, China, India, to name a few) who work at a local level to promote a more pluralistic and socially minded culture of economics studies. The program hopes to expand on the activities conducted by the forum at Haifa to additional universities in Israel, and thus create a national network of students and graduates.
Program Topics
1. The state and market economy 2. Equality and inequality 3. The state of Israeli society 4. Measuring and understanding poverty 5. Welfare policy 7. Co-ops and the labor market 6. GPO, growth and ecology

Labor Organizing Program

Rationale and goals

For the last two decades, Israel has gone through a negative process that now makes it one of the four most unequal societies among OECD countries. Some 40% of salaried employees earn less than the minimum wage (less than 5,000 NIS), 15% of all workers are outsourced workers. 65% of families living under the poverty line are employed, and while wages have stagnated, cost of living has only continued to skyrocket.

In response, recent years have witnessed an ongoing surge of new labor unions, with over 120,000 workers unionizing since 2011.  This mass wave of labor organizing is perhaps the most important, concrete and effective social process taking place in Israel in recent years. Coupled with growing public awareness of labor rights, these unions play a central role in the attempt to mend the labor market and reduce inequality.

SEA’s labor organizing program offers an introduction to the world of labor in Israel and trains labor organizers by offering the theoretical and practical toolkit needed to understand the labor market and worker’s rights, as well as work in the field to unionize workers as social activism.

SEA is the only NGO in Israel working in this field and its expertise span over a decade. Since 2005, more than18 courses training labor organizers have been conducted by SEA. Graduates of the courses have gone on to join labor unions and to organize teachers, social workers, janitors, security guards, bus drivers and others.

Target Audience

Workers who want to learn about their rights and attain the tools needed to take advantage of their rights and organize.

Social activist who want to learn how to organize workers and play a role in unionization processes.

Program Topics

  • Social and economic policy in Israel and its ramification on the labor market
  • A history of labor struggles around the word and in Israel
  • A look abroad – International models of organized labor
  • Workers’ rights: Labor laws and legal defences
  • Disenfranchised groups in the labor market – an overview
  • How to Organize? How to deal with Union busting?
  • campaigning and media
  • Labor-Community partnership building
  • Meetings with labor organizers and unions’ leadership

Program's Structure

  • Part 1: The labor movement in Israel: History, Politics, trends + international perspective.
  • Part 2: Introduction into the world of labor and the different rights open to workers.
  • Part 3: Legal, economic and social aspects of organized labor.
  • Part 4: Practical training and toolkit for leading workers’ organization.The program is comprised of 10- 15 meetings which include lectures, workshops and informal talks with leading activists in the field.The program detailed here is a basic outline which will be given to changes and adjustment in accordance to the unique character of the group and its membership. Some of the lectures and workshops can be given in Arabic.

Past Courses

Dr. Ohad Karni

Head of business sustainability and the Ministry of Environmental Protection. Former chairman of the adjunct lecturers organization at Tel Aviv University and a strategic consultant for Shaldor Consultants. Holds a doctorate in life sciences and a degree in business administration. A graduate of Mimshak (Interface) a program for implementing science in government. A senior and prominent activist in the SEA since its establishment.

Socially oriented Israeli geeks try to change ‘Darwinist’ spirit of start-up nation

Originally published on Haaretz, 25.12.2013
Frustration felt by Israeli social activists over their inability to alter government policy has led to numerous initiatives aimed at changing the world from the ground up. The frustration felt by Israeli social activists over their inability to alter government policy has led to numerous initiatives aimed at changing the world from the ground up, like cooperatives and new companies owned by workers or consumers. One of the more fascinating of these endeavors is Carmel, a programing cooperative that is challenging one of Israeli capitalism’s main sources of pride: the high-tech industry.The founders of the Haifa-based cooperative, which was launched in August and is currently in the final stages of the registration process, are four high-tech journeymen who are also social activists. Noam Levy, 36, and Carmel Neta, 28, are active in the Democratic Workers Organization; Yosef Baruch, 38, was a leader of the Hazit Hatzfonit (Northern Front) group during the social protests; and Idan Kaminer, 42, is an activist in public broadcasting. Met in protest tent Nothing that can be found in their office, located on the sixth floor of a building in Haifa’s hiCenter high-tech park, hints at what their company was founded to do.The generic glass doors, whiteboards and programming books don’t give anything away. “Noam and I met when we studied computer science together,” says Baruch, who was unanimously voted CEO of the company. “During the protests of 2011, I came to the tents in Haifa to see what was going on. I saw smoke, heard drums and people screaming ‘the people demand social justice,’ but didn’t know what to think of it. Only when I saw Noam did I realize that there were serious people there, and it was worthwhile to sit down and talk. I sat down, and didn’t move from there for two years.” Carmel employees say that not everything that glitters is gold in the startup nation. “The approach to high-tech is very Darwinist,” says Levy. “It used to be at Microsoft that the worst 5 percent would be sent home.There’s the well-known limit at age 40, after which you’re overqualified and the amount of positions open to you is very small, because you only need so many managers and department heads.” “High-tech is a cruel world, unlike any other,” adds Baruch. “And startups are the cruelest. They expect the employees to work for free, but only one in 10 startups succeeds. You’ve got an expiration date, and it will come much sooner than you’ll reach retirement age. Even if I’m on a secure management path, some 25-year-old accountant can decide to cut the cost of my salary with one cold-hearted decision.” According to Baruch, “Management flexibility is mostly an excuse to fire people over a certain age. The high-tech market in Israel has not reached its human potential because it’s mired in ageist thinking. The industry is training new programmers, even though there are programmers over the age of 50 who are willing to work for low pay.”The idea to conduct their company differently came up during a course on cooperatives at the Social Economic Academy. Weeks before the course, Medingo, where Levy was employed, was sold for $160 million to the Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche and had to close. He saw something absurd in the situation. “The company I worked for had to close because it was successful. Medingo was a very successful place, and it was actually the success that made it break up. Isn’t that stupid?” he notes.“We thought about whether we should go in as employees in the industry or try to start something new − and we went with something new,” Levy continues. “Since we decided to work together, each one of us has received at least two job offers.” The most important thing is making social action part of life, they say. “I don’t like social action that’s totally disconnected from politics,” says Neta. “No evenings-only social action, or Saturday night protests. The only way to make real change is through the workforce and the economy. Currently, our company is building an information system for a big university, and other companies’ websites, with the goal of generating initial income. For the future, our cooperative is planning to develop an agricultural product.”In the meantime, the members are trying to formulate rules for the cooperative. They’d like to see all the employees join them as members of the cooperative, including maintenance workers. Also, the highest salary won’t be more than five times the lowest salary, in the worst-case scenario. In the meantime, the four partners have equal salaries. “Rules sound technical, but it’s a declaration of intent as to how this place should function,” says Baruch enthusiastically. “We’re making breakthroughs into uncharted territory, trying to forge a new path, to have people follow our lead and take responsibility. The cooperative rules are also about mutual responsibility, for all the workers. If the ship hits a storm, we won’t start to throw sailors overboard. We’ll tighten our belts and make decisions together. Layoffs will be a last resort. All the workers will make decisions together.”The work hours are also convenient in relation to the industry: four days a week, eight hours a day. “The high-tech stereotype, that it’s a place to make quick, easy money, then run away, seeps into the workplace. A high-tech employee who works 12 hours is doing something wrong. He won’t be able to do that for years on end, and will break at some point,” says Baruch.A whiteboard in the office displays the hours that employees can’t work, like the times when Levy has to take his children to school. Programming cooperatives have already sprung up in London and California. In September, another programming cooperative called Permatech was launched in Israel, bringing freelancers together to work in a loosely cooperative framework. Permatech created the Kifaya system to report racism, which was initiated by the Agenda organization. “We want as many socially oriented programs as we can find, and we give discounts to charitable organizations,” said Tailor Vijay, one of the Permatech founders, who said his cooperative has a waiting list of 100 programmers. ‘Quality products, too’ “It’s natural that people with skill and education would prefer to work on their own, without having people make profit at the expense of their talents,” says attorney Yifat Solel, who consults for both cooperatives.“These cooperatives are trying to bring sanity back to high-tech work, to set reasonable hours and a fair salary. This creates not only a pleasant, equal workplace, but quality products.” “We decided to work from an office, so that the work would be taken seriously,” says Baruch. “You get up in the morning, go to work and clock in. It’s like a factory. I don’t want people to see our project as a social club. We’re just like Egged drivers who worked in a cooperative − we want to be the Egged of Israeli high-tech.” Asked to describe reactions from the rest of the Israeli high-tech world, Levy says they vary. “I’ve gotten skeptical looks from many people − they didn’t know what to make of us. We got good reactions from workers, though.”

(Hebrew) התוכנית לפעילים מוניציפליים של המכללה מגיעה לחדרה, פרדס חנה וירושלים

העסקה פוגענית באמצעות חברות קבלן הגיעה גם למעמד הביניים הישראלי. קובץ מאמרים בנושא מציע דרכים לריפוי הרעה החולה הזאת.

העסקה פוגענית: הדרה וניצול שיטתיים בשוק העבודה. עורכים: דניאל מישורי וענת מאור. הוצאת אחווה והמכללה החברתית כלכלית, 316 עמ’, 79 שקלים

מה משותף לחברת סונול, האוניברסיטה הפתוחה, פלאפון, סלקום, כלל ביטוח, חברות כרטיסי האשראי, קייטרינג שפע, בורגראנץ’, יו־בנק, ש.ל.ה – ועוד כמה עשרות חברות ברוב ענפי המשק? עובדי החברות הללו החליטו להתארגן במסגרת ההסתדרות או אחד מארגוני העובדים הקטנים יותר, ולהקים ועד עובדים שייצג אותם כנגד ההנהלות. אחרי שנים ארוכות של חשש או היסוס, עובדים רבים במשק – בשנים האחרונות מגיע מספרם ל–70-60 אלף, החליטו לנסות לשנות את תנאי העסקתם. לא מלחמת מעמדות לפנינו, אבל בכל זאת משהו.

הרקע למגמת ההתארגנויות הללו מגוון. המיתון הכלכלי שהחל ב–2008 והפך את שוק העבודה הישראלי לתחום שבו המעסיק הוא הצד החזק במשוואה והעובד הוא החלש, יצר בקרב עובדים רבים כמיהה ליציבות תעסוקתית. הגנה מפני פיטורים שרירותיים על ידי המעסיק נראית היום ערך חשוב יותר מאשר קידום בשכר. ריבוי ההפרות של זכויות העובדים – לעומת אוזלת ידה של הממשלה ביכולתה לאכוף את חוקי העבודה על המעסיקים, תרם אף הוא לרצון ההתארגנות. סיבה נוספת היא ריבוי צורות ההעסקה בישראל ופריחתה של צורת העסקה פוגענית במיוחד: עבודה קבלנית או עבודה באמצעות אותו מתווך הקרוי “חברת קבלן”, או “חברה למתן שירותים”. אין נתונים מדויקים על מספרם של עובדי הקבלן בישראל, אך לפי ההערכות מדובר ב־400–300 אלף, מעל לעשרה אחוזים מכלל השכירים – שיעור גבוה משמעותית לעומת הממוצע במדינות המפותחות.

לפיכך, הספר “העסקה פוגענית: הדרה וניצול שיטתיים בשוק העבודה” רלבנטי כיום, ונראה שגם בעוד שנים רבות. דפוסי העסקה פוגעניים לא נולדו אתמול אלא התפתחו בישראל בעשורים הקודמים. חשופות להם בעיקר קבוצות חלשות כמו עולים חדשים, בני מיעוטים, עובדים זרים ובשנים האחרונות – גם יותר ויותר ישראלים ותיקים ממעמד הביניים. עובדי הקבלן בפרט ועובדי מיקור חוץ בכלל מועסקים כיום כמעט בכל מקום: במגזר הציבורי והפרטי, ברשתות השיווק והתעשייה, ברשויות המקומיות ובמשרדי הממשלה. גם מערכות החינוך, כולל האוניברסיטאות, נגועות בתופעה. ההעסקה הפוגענית מתבטאת בניסיון מודע מצד המעסיק הישיר או העקיף לשלול שכר והטבות שונות מהעובד. זה ניסיון להפלות בין עובדים בכסות חוקית, או תוך הפרת החוק, בהתנערות מהמחויבויות הנגזרות ממערכת היחסים שבין עובד למעביד.

עורכי הספר, ד”ר דניאל מישורי וד”ר ענת מאור, וגם רוב הכותבים בספר, עמדו מאחורי מאבקי העובדים נגד העסקה פוגענית ולמען מימוש זכות ההתארגנות שלהם. הספר מתבסס על מקרים רבים של ניצול עובדים דווקא באוניברסיטאות, אולי מפני שרוב הכותבים הם דרי העולם האקדמי בעצמם, ופחות במקרים של ניצול עובדים במקומות עבודה אחרים כמו מפעלי תעשייה, עיריות או בתי עסק.

חלקו הראשון של הספר עוסק באפיונים כלליים של העסקה פוגענית או מקפחת ובקשר שלהם להפרטה. הכלכלן איציק ספורטה טוען שבישראל, השלטון והמעסיקים שותפים לאותה תפישת עולם שלפיה מה שקורה במקום העבודה אינו ממש חשוב. השיח הדומיננטי, לא רק בקרב מעסיקים אלא גם בקרב אזרחים מן השורה, אינו תנאי העבודה, אלא שווקים, היצע, ביקוש ואינטרסים. כך מתקבלת על הדעת מציאות שבה כל עובד מקבל את מה שנקבע לו על ידי השוק בהתאם לתרומתו השולית לרווחים של המעסיק.

פרופ’ יצחק הרפז טוען בספר שעולם העבודה בישראל של תחילת המאה ה–21 מזכיר את המאה ה-19 בקיפוח ובהתנכלות למגזרי עובדים שונים, הבאים לידי ביטוי בהפרות של חוקי העבודה והסכמי השכר הקיבוציים. ד”ר אפרים דוידי כותב שמאז ומעולם נעשתה בישראל אבחנה בין סוגי עובדים: בתחילה עובדים ישראלים מול עובדים פלסטינים ובהמשך עובדים זרים; המוטו תמיד הוא הרצון להעסיק עובדים זולים במשק הישראלי. דוידי טוען שהממשלה מעודדת דפוסי עבודה פוגעניים. ענת מאור גורסת שמשנות ה–80, במיוחד “העשור בשחור” שבין 1997 ל–2007, הנהיגו ממשלות ישראל תהליכים של פירוק העבודה המאורגנת והוזלת עלויות העבודה, והתעלמו מחובתן להגן על עובדים חלשים.

פרופ’ דני גוטוויין קושר בין עבודה פוגענית לבין ההפרטה, שמטרתה פירוק העבודה המאורגנת בישראל. “הפרטה היא פרויקט פוליטי המשרת את האינטרסים של ההון ואחראי לפירוק מדינת הרווחה”, כותב גוטוויין. ”בכך נשחק הביטחון החברתי של מעמד הביניים, תוך דחיקת המעמדות הנמוכים אל מתחת לסף העוני והעמקת הפערים בין המגזרים השונים”. פרופ’ גדי אלגזי ואורלי בנימין מתריעים על כך שתהליכים אלה של הפרטה וקיפוח קיימים באוניברסיטאות והסובלים מכך הם בעיקר מורים מן החוץ ועובדים במשרות אדמיניסטרטיביות ובתחום התחזוקה.

עו”ד איתי סבירסקי, שהיה ממקימי ארגון “כוח לעובדים” ב–2007, מגיע למסקנה שלנוכח היעדר אכיפה של נורמות העסקה הוגנות על ידי המדינה או ההסתדרות – התארגנות של עובדים והקמת ועדים הן הכלי היעיל ביותר למימוש זכויותיהם של העובדים. הכותבים מעידים שהתחושות הפסימיות שליוו אותם בעת כתיבת הספר השתנו מעט באחרונה ונעשו אופטימיות יותר, אולי מפני ש”כוחות התיקון” נמצאו ב–2012 בתנופה מסוימת, בעקבות חבילת החוקים החדשים המגינים על העובדים ותנועת המחאה של 2011. טוב היה אילו השתתפו בכתיבת הספר לא רק אנשי אקדמיה ופעילי איגודים מקצועיים, אלא גם פוליטיקאים ואנשי ציבור מהקואליציה והאופוזיציה, וכן, גם אנשי שלטון. כי אז השפעתו של הספר היתה חורגת מעבר לחוגים שממילא מכירים בחומרת הבעיה של ניצול עובדים חלשים והפקרתם ללא הגנה מספקת.

לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק. לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק. לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק. לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק. לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק.

(Hebrew) כיצד מורים והורים יכולים לפעול אל מול הפרטת מערכת החינוך? איך יוצרים איגודי עובדים דמוקרטיים הפועלים לטובת כלל ציבור העובדים?

מה יקרה לישראל אם הסינים יקימו אומת סטארט אפ מתחרה? דה-מרקר, 21.11.2013
מעמד העובדים ברחבי העולם הולך ונשחק ■ איגודי העובדים בארה”ב נלחמים מלחמת מאסף באוליגרכים, אולם לא נותנים מענה רלוונטי לאיומים של הגלובליזציה והטכנולוגיה ■ ומדוע איגודים מושחתים משחקים לטובת המעסיקים
אם אתם אמריקאים וצריכים להתפרנס מעבודה, אתם עלולים למצוא את עצמכם בקבוצה של אנשים אומללים למדי: הזכויות שלכם לחופשות, חופשות מחלה, שכר מינימום, ביטוח רפואי והגנה מפני פיטורים לא מוצדקים הן מהגרועות בעולם המערבי, ונמצאות בשחיקה גוברת והולכת. שלא לדבר על כך שאם אתם מובטלים יותר מכמה חודשים, הסיכויים שלכם למצוא עבודה הם אפסיים, בין אם אתם צעירים או מבוגרים. אבל גם אם אתם ישראלים, שחיים בכלכלה שלכאורה נראית צומחת, עם אבטלה מהנמוכות בעולם המערבי, יכול להיות שאתם צריכים לדאוג.

מנקודת מבטם של מומחים ליחסי עבודה, העולם הפוליטי־כלכלי־חברתי, כפי שהוא פועל כיום, בנוי לרעתם של העובדים. למעשה, לא צריך להיות פרופסור ליחסי עבודה כמו גורדון לייפר מאוניברסיטת אורגון, כדי להבין שמצב העובדים בעולם המערבי קשה כפי שלא היה מאז המהפכה התעשייתית, אולי. לייפר, בשיחה עם TheMarker על שוק העבודה האמריקאי, שנערכה ביום שבו ערך סדנה למורים במכללה החברתית־כלכלית על הפרטת החינוך בארה”ב ובישראל, סיפר על דעיכתה הקשה של תנועת העבודה, על מאבק אדיר וממומן היטב של תאגידים ובעלי אינטרסים לחוקק חוקים ברמת הערים והמדינות נגד זכויות עובדים.

לא צריך להיות יועץ של איגודים כדי להצביע על הקושי הגובר והולך של עובדים. אפילו המגזין הכלכלי השמרני “אקונומיסט” הקדיש שער בחודש החולף למצוקת העובדים. הנתונים ברורים מאוד: חלקם של העובדים בעוגה הכלכלית מצטמק והולך. בארה”ב, הכנסתם ירדה ב–30 שנה מ–70% מהתמ”ג ל–64%, לפי OECD. ירידות חדות במיוחד נרשמו בחברות שוויוניות כמו נורווגיה, שבה נתח ההכנסות של העובדים ירד מ–64% ב–1980 ל–55% כיום. בשוודיה הנתח ירד מ–74% ב–1980 ל–65% כיום. הצניחה נרשמה גם בשווקים מתעוררים רבים, במיוחד באסיה. במדינות OECD נתח העובדים בהכנסה ירד מ–66% בתחילת שנות ה–90 ל–62% בעשור הקודם.

בה בעת, פריון העבודה גדל, משמעותית. ניתן לראות את התרחבות הפער בין כמה שעובדים מייצרים עבור תאגידים, לבין מה שהתאגידים משלמים להם בתרשים המצורף. המשמעות של הגרף העצוב הזה היא כזו: התאגידים מוכרים יותר ומרוויחים יותר מכל שעת עבודה, והכלכלה בממוצע צומחת – אבל הצמיחה הזו הולכת, כנראה, למי שהוא בעל התאגיד ולוקח את הרווח, ולא לעובדים שמייצרים עבורו את הרווחים. אפשר לראות זאת בהשוואה של צמיחת פריון העבודה לשכר העובדים, ואפשר לראות זאת בתרשים של שיעור ההכנסות של העובדים מכלל ההכנסות הלאומיות.

ארה”ב היא מקרה קיצוני יחסית של הזנחת זכויות העובדים. לייפר מביא כמה דוגמאות שאפילו אוהדיו המושבעים של השוק החופשי לא היו שמחים להתהדר בהן: בעיר אחת הצביעו במשאל עם בעד מתן ימי חופשת מחלה בתשלום לעובדים, שלהם לא היתה זכות לאף יום קודם לכן. כמה ימים הציעו לתת בחוק לעובדים? חמישה בשנה. בישראל, לשם השוואה, המספר הוא 18. התוצאה של העברת החוק היתה מאמץ לוביסטי ברמת המדינה לחוקק חוק שיאסור על מועצות לאפשר הצבעה במשאל על מתן חופשת מחלה בתשלום כלל ועיקר.

לייפר מסביר כי החלטת בית המשפט העליון בארה”ב לא להגביל מתן תרומות פוליטיות (סיטיזנס יונייטד) גרמה לכך שבתי המחוקקים של 50 המדינות בארה”ב מושפעים משמעותית מכספי תורמים. העשירים שבתורמים, כמובן, הם התאגידים ובעלי העסקים. סנאטורית אחת בבית מחוקקים כזה, דמוקרטית אפילו, קיבלה הצעה לממן יוזמה להגדלת התעסוקה באמצעות הטלת מס על אנשים שמשתכרים יותר ממיליון דולר בשנה. הסנאטורית התפלצה: אלה בדיוק התורמים הגדולים שלי. וכך הם גם התורמים הגדולים ברוב המקומות: רשתות המזון המהיר, שמעסיקות את העובדים הזולים ביותר; רשתות הקמעונות הענקיות. וול־מארט ומקדונלד’ס מעסיקות את העובדים העניים ביותר בארה”ב, שמקבלים סעד של מיליארדי דולרים. למקדונלד’ס יש אפילו תוכנית בשם מק־ריסורס, שבה מקבלים עובדיה ייעוץ מהמעסיק איך לחלץ יותר סעד מהממשלה. עובדי וול־מארט משתכרים כה מעט, עד שהם מקבלים סיוע ממשלתי של 1,000 דולר בחודש בממוצע לעובד.

למנהיגי הפועלים
 חסר חזון

אבירי השוק החופשי טוענים כי שכר העובדים נקבע על־פי ביקוש והיצע באופן הוגן. פגשנו אחד מהקיצוניים שבהם בחודש האחרון, שטען כי שכר מינימום בעצם מגביר את האבטלה, כי הוא מונע ממעסיקים שמוכנים לשלם מתחת לו לגייס עובדים, שלדברי אותו אדם, מוכנים לעבוד בפחות משכר המינימום, אך לא יכולים לעשות זאת בגלל החוק.

כנגד הטענה שההגנות על שכר ותנאים של העובדים מייקרות מוצרים ושירותי, מביא לייפר דוגמה: באיידהו משלמת רשת בתי הקפה סטארבאקס למלצרים את שכר המינימום שנקבע בחוק הפדרלי, 2.13 דולרים לשעה (החוק נקבע ב–1991 ושכחו להצמיד אותו לאינפלציה). לעומתה, באורגון הסמוכה, שכר המינימום של המדינה הוא 8.95 דולרים לשעה. לפי חוקי השוק, אומר לייפר, קפה של סטארבאקס באיידהו היה אמור להיות זול יותר, והם היו אמורים להעסיק יותר עובדים, בהתאם לתירוץ שככל שהעובדים יקרים יותר מעסיקים פחות מהם. בפועל, משני צדי הגבול מועסק אותו מספר של עובדים ומחיר הקפה זהה.

מכיוון שבארה”ב אתוס השוק החופשי ועוצמתו הפוליטית והכלכלית של הלובי העסקי אינם מאפשרות להרחיק לכת ולבקש לעובדים תנאים כמו באירופה ובישראל, למשל, מספר לייפר שהמאמץ שלו ושל האיגודים מתרכז בתעשיות שיש להן שולי רווח גבוהים, שאין להן תחרות מחו”ל, שאי אפשר להעתיק אותן לשווקים אחרים – כמו תיירות, מסעדנות, שירותי בריאות. השאר, ובעיקר העסקים הקטנים שמתחרים על פירורי רווחים, הם מקרה אבוד מבחינת פעילי האיגודים. לייפר אינו מציע פתרון לעובדים של עסקים שחיים על הקצה ואם יעלו את שכר העובדים יחוסלו.

אחת הבעיות הבולטות העולות מהדיון בזכויות עובדים כיום הוא שכמו הפוליטיקאים והמדינאים – אפילו אלה שכוונותיהם טובות ויושרתם אמיתית – גם מנהיגי הפועלים שרוצים לפתור את הבעיה אינם יודעים איך לעשות זאת, ואין להם חזון או מודל חדשני לעולם המשתנה. כמה מהגורמים המשמעותיים ביותר בשחיקה – גלובליזציה שמעבירה משרות לסין ולכלכלות הזולות, או מביאה עובדים זרים וזולים; וטכנולוגיה, שמחליפה אדם במכונה – אינם ניתנים לעצירה. פוקסקון, יצרנית האייפדים הידועה לשמצה בשל היחס הגרוע לעובדים שהתגלה במפעליה, שוקלת לעבור לעבוד עם רובוטים – הם עושים הרבה פחות בעיות ולא נוטים לקפוץ מהגג ולעשות בושות כמו בני אנוש. את לייפר החזון הזה מזעזע, אבל הוא לא מציע לשבור את המכונות.

לייפר דיבר אתנו לא מעט על הנמלים בארה”ב, שגם בהם עתידם של מפעילי המנופים מאוים על ידי רובוטים. אפילו עובדי הנמלים בארה”ב אינם מאוגדים ברובם כיום, מספר לייפר, שעבד עם איגודי החוף המערבי (בעלי הצביון הפוליטי השמאלי) ועם איגודי החוף המזרחי (שלמאפיה דריסת רגל משמעותית בהם, כפי ששיקפה גם העונה השנייה והמופתית של “הסמויה”).

אזכור הנמלים מעלה בקרב המאזינים הישראלים תסיסה רבה. מדוע לתת כוח כה רב לוועד שמחזיק את האצבע על השאלטר של המדינה? מה קורה כשהכוח משחית? בארה”ב נראה כי השחיתות לובשת צורות שונות מאלה שמוכרות בישראל, אבל לייפר טוען כי היא איננה רע הכרחי של עבודה מאורגנת. כשאיגוד עובדים מושחת, הוא אומר, הוא משרת טוב יותר את האינטרסים של המעסיק, שיכול לקנות את ראשי האיגוד בבצע כסף או טובות הנאה, ולשלם כך מחיר נמוך בהרבה מהמחיר של שיפור מצבם של העובדים. לפיכך, האינטרס שיהיה איגוד חזק, דמוקרטי ובריא הוא אינטרס של רוב העובדים, ולא של המיעוט שעשוי לתפוס את המקומות הקרובים לסיר הבשר.

אז מה בכל זאת אפשר לעשות כדי לשפר את מצבם של העובדים? “אקונומיסט”, אביר השוק החופשי, מציע להוריד משמעותית את מס החברות. הצעה דומה הציע ליאור לוין במאמר שפורסם ב-TheMarker אתמול: לחתוך לחצי את מס החברות בתנאי שמפעלים יחלקו את רווחיהם לעובדים. אפשרות אחרת, קצת בדומה למודל ההיי־טק בישראל, היא לתת לעובדים בעלות, ולו מזערית, על המפעל – ולהפוך אותם לבעלי הון. “אקונומיסט” גם אוהב את הרעיון הזה, וסבור שצריך להעלות את המס על ההון, הנמוך משמעותית מהמס על עבודה.

ללייפר יש הצעות קונקרטיות, אבל הן נשמעות כמו אצבע קטנה מדי בחור גדול מדי בסכר. הוא נותן לדוגמה חוק באורגון, מדינת הבית שלו, שאוסר לייצא מאורגון בולי עץ שלמים, אלא רק קורות חתוכות, ובכך משאיר את העבודה של חיתוך העץ באורגון. הוא גם מביא דוגמה על ענף הדיג באלסקה, שבו מיוצאים דגים שלמים (למעט הראש) לסין, שם הם מעובדים וחוזרים בתור מוצר ארוז לארה”ב לצריכה. “למה שאלסקה לא תחוקק חוק שאוסר לייצא דגים שלמים?” הוא מציע.

עם הזדקנות האוכלוסייה, העלייה בגיל הפרישה, וכל התהליכים שתוארו כאן, החלק של האוכלוסייה שיש לו כישורים שלא ניתן להחליפם בקלות על ידי מחשבים או פועלים סיניים מצטמצם והולך. “בסין מוקמות מאות אוניברסיטאות מצוינות”, אומר לייפר. “מי אומר לכם הישראלים שהמהנדסים הסיניים של עוד 20 שנה לא יוכלו להחליף את אומת הסטארט־אפ? מה תעשו אז?”

התשובה איננה ברורה, אבל אולי היא אפורה יותר ממה שאנחנו חושבים. תהליכי הגלובליזציה מתחילים בשינויים מהירים ומזעזעים, אבל בחלוף רבע מאה בערך מאז שהחל גל הגלובליזציה האחרון, אפשר לראות שהשכר בסין עולה, ושמהנדסי בנגלור לא נחשבים לתחליף כל כך מבוקש למהנדסים במערב. יכול להיות שיתחולל תהליך של איזון ובקרה עצמית בין הכלכלות השונות, בין המאזן הדמוגרפי המורע לבין המשאבים הטבעיים; יכול להיות שתומצא טכנולוגיה חדשה, שתדרוש דורות חדשים של חדשנות ובינה אנושית – כמו מסע בין כוכבים; או יכול להיות שטכנולוגיה חדשה או מבנה חברתי חדש יאפשרו להגשים את החזון האוטופי שבו אנשים לא יצטרכו לעבוד הרבה ועדיין יוכלו לחיות בכבוד – זה מה שרובנו רוצים, לא הרבה יותר מזה.

“האיגודים המקצועיים לא צריכים להיות חברות ביטוח לעובדים”. דה מרקר, 20.6.2013
בשנים האחרונות נתונים איגודי העובדים בארה”ב למתקפה מצד המחוקקים במדינות, המבקשים – ומצליחים בהדרגה – לשלול זכויות משא ומתן קיבוצי וזכויות אחרות מעובדי ממשל ■ לדברי פרופ’ גורדון לייפר, מומחה ליחסי עבודה ויועץ לאיגודים, מאחורי המתקפה נמצאים גורמים עסקיים
זה היה אחד המאבקים העזים ביותר בתולדות תנועת העובדים של ארה”ב. השנה היתה 2011, והמושל הרפובליקאי של ויסקונסין, סקוט ווקר, הגיש בעיצומו של החורף הצעת חוק שנועדה לשלול את זכויות המשא ומתן הקיבוצי מעובדי הממשל המקומי. בפועל, הצעה זו נועדה לחסל את התאגדויות עובדי מדינת ויסקונסין, בטענה כי רק כך יצליח הממשל לקצץ בהוצאות ולמנוע משבר תקציבי.

עשרות אלפי אנשים שהגיעו כדי להפגין מול הקפיטול של מדיסון, בירת ויסקונסין, היו הסנוניות שבישרו את מחאת “לכבוש את וול סטריט”, שנולדה יותר מחצי שנה לאחר מכן. מאחורי הקלעים פעלו נציגים מטעמו של הנשיא, ברק אובמה, לצד האיגודים, ועמותות חמושות שהוקמו בכספי מיליארדרים שמרניים מימנו את הקמפיין הרפובליקאי.

“בשנתיים־שלוש האחרונות היו התקפות על איגודי העובדים של עובדי הממשל, בעיקר המורים. זה התחיל בוויסקונסין”, מסביר פרופ’ גורדון לייפר, מומחה לתחום יחסי העבודה מאוניברסיטת אורגון, שהיה גם יועץ מדיניות בכיר לוועדת החינוך והעבודה של הקונגרס האמריקאי. לייפר יעביר ב-26 ביוני סדנה פתוחה לציבור שמארגנת המכללה החברתית כלכלית בבית אגרון בירושלים בנושא הפרטת מערכת החינוך בארה”ב ובישראל.

מאז 2011 עובד לייפר עם המכון למדיניות כלכלית בוושינגטון, המזוהה עם ארגוני העובדים, בתיאום ופיקוח על מחקרים בתחום יחסי העבודה. חלק גדול ממחקרו עוסק במאבקים על החינוך ואיגודי המורים, שנחשבו במשך שנים לאיגודים הגדולים והחזקים בארה”ב, ונתונים כיום תחת המתקפה הקשה ביותר של מאמצי חקיקה רפובליקאים להחליש את כוחם. “האג’נדה היא לכאורה המשבר התקציבי. ואולם, כשמסתכלים על הראיות מגלים שאין שום קשר בין התאגדות למשבר תקציבי. בעשר מדינות שבהן אין הסכם עם האיגודים יש משבר תקציבי. ובחלק מדינות שיש בהן הסכם עם האיגודים אין משבר”.

האיגודים בוויסקונסין הפסידו – המחוקקים העבירו את הצעתו של המושל. מפלות דומות רשמה העבודה המאורגנת ברחבי ארה”ב. הניצחון הגדול ביותר של ווקר הגיע כששרד הצעה להדיחו ‏(ריקול‏) ב2012 – והיה המושל הראשון בתולדות ארה”ב שהצעת הדחה נגדו נדחתה. היתה זו תבוסה משפילה לצד הדמוקרטי ולאיגודים.

כיום אין בוויסקונסין זכות משא ומתן קיבוצי לעובדי ממשל, למעט עובדי משטרה, כבאים, תחבורה ושירותי רפואת חירום. החוק לא מאפשר לאיגודים לבקש העלאת שכר, מלבד הצמדה למדד, ואוסר לשאת ולתת באופן קיבוצי על שלל נושאים, כמו בטיחות בעבודה, חופשות וביטוח בריאות. בתחילת החודש הסכים בית המשפט העליון של ויסקונסין לדון בערעור שהגישו איגודי המורים במדינה על החוק. שופט באחד המחוזות במדינה פסק כי החוק פוגע בזכויות חוקתיות כמו חופש הדיבור, חופש ההתאגדות וייצוג שווה.

ויסקונסין אינה המדינה היחידה שפעלה נגד איגודים. מושל ניו ג’רזי, כריס כריסטי, שלל זכויות ותק ממורים בשנה שעברה. 24 מדינות העבירו חוק בשם “הזכות לעבוד” – שמגביל משמעותית את זכותם של איגודים לדרוש מעובדים להיות חברים בהם. במהלך הבחירות לנשיאות הפעילו כמה מעסיקים גדולים, בעיקר תעשייניים שמרנים כמו האחים קוך, תעמולה אגרסיבית בקרב עובדיהם, בנוסח “אם תצביעו למועמד מסוים, יש סיכוי שתאבדו את מקום עבודתכם”. לייפר כתב אז שטקטיקות אלה ראויות לרפובליקות בננות ולא לדמוקרטיה חופשית כארה”ב.

המכות שספגו האיגודים בבתי המחוקקים עלו ביוקר לכל תנועת העובדים האמריקאית. ב-2012 הגיע שיעור החברות הכוללת באיגודים מקצועיים בארה”ב לשפל שלא נרשם מאז שנות ה-30 – 11.3% מכוח העבודה הארצי, לעומת 20.1% לפני שלושה עשורים. איגוד החינוך הלאומי ‏(NEA‏), אחד משני איגודי המורים הגדולים ביותר, איבד 100 אלף מחבריו.

לא רק איגודי העובדים הממשלתיים נפגעו

לייפר טוען שבמגזר הפרטי פועלים כוחות שונים מאשר במגזר הציבורי.”במגזר הפרטי רק 7% מהעובדים מאוגדים. הגורם העיקרי לכך הוא שאין חוקים שמגינים על העובדים. אם תנסי לארגן איגוד בעיתון ויפטרו אותך, תתקשי להוכיח שזו הסיבה לפיטורים. וגם אם כן, לכל היותר יצטרכו לשלם לך פיצוי של שכרך, מינוס השכר שקיבלת בעבודה החדשה, כלומר סכום הקרוב לאפס”.
בישראל התעוררו באחרונה עובדים במגזרים שלא היו בהם איגודים באופן מסורתי, כמו רשתות מזון מהיר וטלקום. איך בארה”ב המגמה הפוכה?

“מאז המשבר מצבם של העובדים הוחמר. מצד אחד, יש יותר עניין באיגודים מאשר בעבר, בשל המצב הקשה של הכלכלה. אבל יש גם יש יותר פחד. כולם חוזרים הביתה ושומעים מבני הזוג שלהם שצריך לשמור על העבודה. לפי הערכות יש 50-25 מיליון אמריקאים שהיו רוצים איגוד, ואין להם”.

בשבוע שבו יו”ר ועד עובדי נמל אשדוד סופג נזיפה פומבית מראש מפלגת העבודה בישראל, ההגנה של לייפר על איגודים מקצועיים עשויה ליפול על אוזניים ערלות. לייפר שמע על ההסתדרות, אולם מסרב לדבר עליה, באמרו כי אינו יודע די.

בוא נדבר בכנות: איגודים הם לעתים מקומות שמטפחים שחיתות, שבהם צוברים כוח ושוכחים להגן על העובדים החלשים. ב-2011, 47% מהאמריקאים חשבו שאיגודי המורים פוגעים בבתי הספר הציבוריים.

לייפר רואה את חשיבותם של איגודים מקצועיים בדרגים הנמוכים יותר. “הלב של איגוד מקצועי הוא דמוקרטיה, ולא רק במובן של ייצוג, אלא של אקטיביזם ושל השתתפות. איגוד צריך להיות לא חברת ביטוח עבור העובדים, אלא רשת של אנשים שמדברים ועובדים ביחד – לא רק מצביעים בעד דבר זה או אחר”.

לייפר מודה שאיגודים רבים מתאבנים ומתנוונים, ושנדרש משבר לעתים כדי לשנות את דרכם. “עבדתי עם איגוד של עובדי מרכולים, אצל מעסיק שבו 60% מהעובדים התחלפו כל שלוש שנים. בשל התחלופה, לאיגוד היה אכפת רק מ-25% מהעובדים, שהם הוותיקים ביותר, וממקבלי השכר הגבוה, והם התעלמו מעובדים זוטרים וצעירים – אורזי השקיות והסבלים. מה שקרה זה שהמעסיק הציע חוזה, והאיגוד סירב לו. המעסיק פנה לכל העובדים הצעירים ואמר להם ‘לא משתינים עליכם, בואו אתי’, והם אישרו את החוזה. בעקבות המקרה האיגוד התעורר, והבין שצריך לדאוג לשאת ולתת על הדברים שחשובים לכל העובדים”.

הקמעונית קוסטקו ‏(שכתבה עליה מ”ביזנסוויק” מתפרסמת בגיליון יוני של מגזין TheMarker‏) משלמת לעובדיה יותר מהמתחרות, מטפחת קשרים עם האיגודים, ומצליחה יותר בעסקים ובבורסה. אתה חושב שזה מודל לעתיד? האם התפישה שעסקים צריכים לפעול בצורה אתית שלא פוגעת בסביבה ובעובדים תמשול אי פעם?

בנקודה הזו מאבד לייפר חלק ניכר מההתלהבות שהפגין עד כה בריאיון. “אני לא מאמין שיקרה שינוי כזה. יש מקרים בודדים, כמו קוסטקו, שבהם זה הגיוני. הייתי רוצה שגישה אתית תהיה הרווחית ביותר, אבל זה לא ככה. אני לא חושב שוול מארט טועה בזה שהיא משלמת מעט כדי להרוויח הרבה. הם חישבו נכון, הם לא טיפשים, זה מה שיעשה להם הרבה כסף. אי אפשר להיות נאיבים. המנהלים האלה צריכים למקסם את הרווח, וזו לא טעות.

“אבל בדברים כמו חינוך”, הוא מתעורר מחדש, “צריך להילחם לא רק על השכר, אלא האיכות של השירות שנותנים – של החינוך. צריך למצוא דרך לכרות ברית עם ההורים והתלמידים”.

העולם עובר שינוי עצום: טכנולוגיה משבשת, דמוגרפיה מזדקנת – כל אלה פוגעים בסיכויי התעסוקה. האם זה משבר גדול כפי שמציגים את זה, ואם כן, איך אפשר להתמודד?

“המין האנושי עבר שינויים גדולים לא פחות בעבר ושרדנו. זה לא השינוי הכי קשה, אבל הוא שונה – בגלל הטכנולוגיה והגלובליזציה. זה ברור יותר בארה”ב מבישראל – שהשחקנים החזקים ביותר פוליטית התאגידים הגדולים ביותר, עברו תהליך של דה־נציונליזציה. שיעור ההכנסות של תאגידים אמריקאים גדולים מחו”ל הולך וגדל.

“לפני 70-60 שנה הגישה השלטת בקרב תאגידים ומנהלים היתה של בניית האומה – כי הם היו זקוקים לצרכנים ולעובדים. אבל עכשיו הם יכולים להיות במקום אחר – הצרכנים, הלקוחות, העובדים. לחשוב במונחים לאומיים כבר לא ריאליסטי. השחקנים הכי חזקים פוליטית לא ממש קשורים ללבה של הארץ – וזה שינוי משמעותי”.

היית תומך נלהב של תנועת “לכבוש את וול סטריט”. האם אתה חושב שהיא הצליחה לשנות משהו?

לייפר מודה שהתאכזב קשות מדעיכתה של התנועה, וסבור שיש עוד עבודה שצריך לעשות. “האיגודים צריכים לחשוב איך להתארגן בינלאומית – זה אפשרי אבל, מאוד קשה. בעבר בארה”ב חשבו שכל דור יהיה במצב טוב יותר מהקודם. אבל עכשיו רוב האנשים חושבים שמצב ילדיהם יהיה פחות טוב. זה מצב נפיץ ולא יציב פוליטית. זה יוצר הרבה כעס שיכול לפרוץ לכל מיני כיוונים.

“אני סבור שאנשי ה-1% רואים את אמריקה כאימפריה בדעיכה. הם לא מבינים למה צריך את כל שאר האנשים. ל-1% אין אינטרס לאומי, יש להם פנטהאוז בשנחאי והם מוכנים להגר בכל רגע”.

המצב הנוכחי, שבו אי השוויון גדל והתאגידים הגדולים משתלטים על אינטרסים לאומיים, יכול להתקיים לאורך זמן?

“אני לא יודע מה יקרה, אבל אני לא חושב שהעם מתקומם. אני רוצה להאמין שאנשים ימצאו תמיד דרך למרוד נגד אי השוויון ושלטון לא דמוקרטי, בין אם אלה האיגודים כיום ותנועת לכבוש את וול סטריט. מנגד, הפיאודוליזם נמשך מאות שנים, עם כמה מרידות קטנות שדוכאו”.לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק. לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק. לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק. לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק. לורם איפסום דולור סיט אמט, קונסקטורר אדיפיסינג אלית סחטיר בלובק. תצטנפל בלינדו למרקל אס לכימפו, דול, צוט ומעיוט – לפתיעם ברשג – ולתיעם גדדיש. קוויז דומור ליאמום בלינך רוגצה. לפמעט מוסן מנת. ושבעגט ליבם סולגק.

Bnei Brak and Pardes Hanna welcome SEA’s Community Organizing Program

מוניציפלי

SEA’s community organizing program promotes social initiatives and activism at community and municipal levels, these are based on values of social justice. The program supplies highly specialized training for groups from around the country that then go on to lead change in their communities. Taught by leading activists, professional and academics SEA offers groups a deeper understanding of social economic policy and the profound influence it has on the day to day lives of people. Experienced organizers help groups to build and manage effective organizations and campaigns.

SEA brings strategies of community organizing to diverse communities across Israel. Three local groups, representing the diversity of the Israeli public, currently study and trained in SEA’s community organizing program:

Ultra-orthodox Jewish women and men from the city of Elad

פעילות ופעילי תנועת 'עיר ואם-אימהות למען אלעד'

Housing and Education activists from the city of Hedera

IMG-20140731-WA0003 (1)

 Local activists from Haifa

אסיפת העם- קרית אליעזר

(Hebrew) 108 שיעורים על חברה וכלכלה

108 שיעורים על חברה וכלכלה מאת המכללה החברתית כפי שהופיעו ב-Ynet מעורבות

“פינוי ובינוי” האומנם רצוי? ואם כן, כיצד?
“תהליכים של פינוי ובינוי במרקם העירוני הישן הם אסטרטגיה עירונית ותיקה, המופעלת קרוב למאה שנים בערים רבות. חוקרים רבים עוסקים בנושא מזה עשרות שנים והצטבר ידע מחקרי מקיף”. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית
הדעיכה הצפויה של תל אביב
“94% מהשטח המוניציפלי של ת”א, כולל שכונות פרבריות מנומנמות בלבד,שהמשיכה העיקרית אליהן היא קרבתן למרכז התוסס. התרומה העיקרית שלהן היא מיסים עירוניים, אבל אין להם תרומה למרקם ולקצב של עיר אינטנסיבית ופעילה המהווה מרכז מטרופוליני”. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית
העסקה פוגענית והחברה הישראלית
“מי שמסכים עם ניצול של עובדי קבלן בניקיון ובשמירה עלול למצוא את עצמו או את חבריו מנוצלים כמורה-קבלן, כמרצה-קבלן, בנקאי-קבלן, מתכנת-קבלן או כל צורת קיפוח אחרת המאפשרת למעסיק ‘להתייעל’ על חשבון שכרם של עובדים ורווחתם”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית
החסכון הפנסיוני בישראל – מורה נבוכים
רפורמה רודפת רפורמה, תוצאות של שינוי אחד מביאות לתיקון נוסף בוועדה מיוחדת. רועי מימרן, יו”ר פורום החוסכים לפנסיה בישראל, מעביר שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית בשאיפה לעשות לנו קצת סדר בראש בכל הקשור לחסכון הפנסיוני

על סביבה, ערכים ומה שביניהם
“כדאי שנחשוב כל אחד מאתנו על הערכים המנחים אותו והשפעותיהם על עיצוב היום יום שלנו: איך אנחנו מתניידים? איפה אנחנו חיים? מה אנחנו לובשים? מה אנחנו אוכלים? מהם הערכים מאחורי קבלת ההחלטות שלנו בנושאים אלו ואחרים?”. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית
קנו מידע בחנות המדע. האקדמיה בשירות החברה
העובדים בחנות המדע עושים בעיקר עבודת תיווך: הם מקבלים שאלות מארגוני חברה אזרחית, מנגישים מחקר קיים שנעשה בנושא, ואם השאלה דורשת מחקר נוסף הם מאתרים חוקרים לביצוע העבודה. האתגר בעבודה הוא כפול: לתרגם צורך שעולה מהשטח לשאלה למחקר מדעי ואז למצוא את האנשים שיבצעו את המחקר. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית
שיעור על שכר וטכנולוגיה
“לאורך ההיסטוריה של הפיתוח המואץ של הטכנולוגיה מאז המהפכה התעשייתית, היה תפקיד מרכזי לטכנולוגיות המחליפות עובדים במכונות. זה החל במכונות הטוויה והאריגה, נמשך ברכבות ובכלי תחבורה דומים, ובא לביטוי גם כיום במחשבים וביישומיהם”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית

קיץ של מחאה: האם הצליח המאבק החברתי?
ביולי 2011 אישה צעירה אחת החליטה שנמאס לה ויצאה עם אוהל לרחוב. בתוך ימים, התרומם מסך הדיסוננס הקוגנטיבי בו היתה נתונה החברה הישראלית, וההמונים יצאו לרחובות. בזכות מה הצליחה המחאה של קיץ 2011?

מה יהיה עם שוק העבודה בישראל?

“רגולציה נכונה של שוק העבודה היא בעלת פוטנציאל ליצירת צמיחה ומזעור בעיות הנמצאות היום על סדר היום והקשורות לממשל תאגידי, כמו גם לצדק חלוקתי”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית
ציון 100 בכלכלה וחברה. למען חברה צודקת
באוקטובר 2006 פורסם המאמר הראשון של המכללה החברתית-כלכלית. מאז, עלו 99 מאמרים נוספים ששפכו אור, התריעו, ומעל לכל פעלו להרחבת הדיון והמאבק למען צדק חברתי. בתקווה לחברה שיוויונית וצודקת יותר עוד לפני השיעור ה-200

למה לכסף שלנו אין מספיק כוח?
“אחת הבעיות העיקריות בבסיס סוגיית יוקר המחייה בישראל היא הפער בין השכר ליוקר המחייה. אחוז גדל והולך של ישראלים מרוויחים שכר שהולך ונהיה פחות ריאלי ביחס ליוקר המחייה”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית

האשכנזים-חילונים-סוציאליסטים-לאומיים עוד כאן
“ה’אשכנזי’ המוחה מדבר היום בראש וראשונה כאזרח, הסוציאליסט הפך ל’סוציאל-דמוקרט’ והדמוקרטיה החליפה את הלאומיות כדגל מרכזי. הקריאה למדינת רווחה אינה דורשת שיבה לממלכתיות המפא”יניקית החונקת ולועדות המסדרות, אלא לדמוקרטיה חברתית, פתוחה, צודקת ולא לאומנית”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית

לזיהום סביבתי אין גבולות?
אף בר דעת לא היה מוכן לחיות בצמוד לגדר של מפעלים המטפלים בשפכים תעשייתיים מסוכנים ברמת חובב, אלא אם הוא בדואי. אף בר דעת לא היה מוכן לחיות על שפת מכרה פוספטים ולחשוף את ילדיו לקרינה רדיואקטיבית, אלא אם הוא תושב ערד וכסייפה. הריאות של התושבים הללו לא בנויות אחרת, אך בגלל שהם גרים בפריפריה האם ניתן להתייחס אליהם אחרת? שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית
מדוע לא קיימת תוכנית לאומית למאבק בעוני?
בעיצומו של המשבר העולמי, הכריז האיחוד האירופי על שנת 2010 כאל שנת צמצום העוני, שנה בה נתבקשו ממשלות האיחוד לבנות תוכניות ואסטרטגיות המשלבות את רמה הלאומית והרמה הלוקאלית כאחד. ומה באשר לישראל? . שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית
חברות שירותים – האתגר הבא
“במקום להכריע באופן כן וישר בדבר גודלו של המגזר הציבורי, הרשויות בוחרות לכנות את מי שהיו עובדי חברות כוח אדם ‘עובדי חברות שירותים’, להעסיקם כמשתתפים חופשיים, או לחלופין לפטרם בטרם מסתיימת התקופה הרלוונטית”. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית
“העשירים יתעשרו והשאר ישלמו”
“כיום שולט במערכת הפיננסית כלל כלכלי קניבליסטי פשוט: מניפולציה פיננסית כלכלית, הרס וסחיטה הם רווחיים הרבה יותר, מיצירת ערך אמיתי”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית

מותה של אירופה החברתית, הסוציאל דמוקרטית
“שיעור הצמיחה הצפוי של 3.3% בלטביה עבור 2011 מוצג כעדות להצלחה. אבל ידרשו הרבה שנות צמיחה בשיעור זה כדי לחזור להיקף כלכלת לטביה ב-2007. האם קפיצת ‘חתול מת’ זו משכנעת מספיק כך שמדינות אחרות באיחוד האירופי יפעילו מדיניות צנע דומה?”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית

אקטיביזם ועבודה סוציאלית, שילוב מנצח?
“לכאורה נראה כי קיימת הלגיטימציה לשימוש באקטיביזם בעבודה סוציאלית, אך בפועל ממעטים עובדים סוציאליים להשתמש בכלים אלו לקידום צדק חברתי עם ועבור לקוחותיהם”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית
הפרטה במחדל – מדיניות הדיור בישראל
“לעיתים הפרטה מתבצעת לא על ידי פעולה אקטיבית של מכירה, מכרז או רישוי, אלא על ידי צמצום הפעילות השלטונית, באמצעות קיצוץ תקציבי או שינוי חוקים ונהלים, אף שלא חל שינוי בביקוש לשירות הציבורי”. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית

ג’נטריפיקציה ודחיקה על כוס קפה
הצד החיובי של תהליכי ג’נטריפיקציה בולט לעין: בניינים זוכים למתיחות פנים, עסקים חדשים נפתחים, העירייה משקיעה בתשתיות ובניקיון, תחושת הביטחון משתפרת, המחירים עולים, משקיעים מתעניינים, בונים, משפצים ועוד תושבים מגיעים. הצד השלילי פחות בולט לעין וניתן לסכמו במונח רחב אחד: דחיקה
חשבון נפש חברתי-סביבתי
“הפרת האיזון בין אינטרסים כלכליים צרים ופרטניים לבין הצרכים והרצונות של התושבים, היא למעשה הבסיס לכל עוולה חברתית וסביבתית כאחד”. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית

תשובות לתשובה
“חברות ושותפויות הגז והמשקיעים בהן אינם יכולים לטעון כי לא ידעו על האפשרות שהמדינה עשויה לשנות החוקים ודיני המס החלים בתחומן. טיעונים אלו, המתובלים במילים כמו הגינות, צדק והלאמה, לא עומדים במבחן שכל ישר והיכרות עם התחום”. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית

הזכות לחופש ההתאגדות
“הפיטורים הכוחניים במגזר השלישי הם אבן דרך מסוכנת בהמשך הקריסה חברתית במדינת ישראל, מחובתנו כאזרחים לעמוד כגוף אחד נגד הארגונים החברתיים המפטרים עובדים כי ניסו לממש את זכותם להתאגד, ולומר להם שמי שרומס את הזכות לחופש התאגדות, אין לו זכות קיום כארגון חברתי המטפל בעוולות חברתיות”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית

ערים עם הפסקה
האם רפורמה כלשהי תיתן מענה לבעיות היסוד של תכנון ערים בישראל? נראה כי בסבך “ההולילנדים”, שאלה יסודית זו נשכחה מלב ואיש אינו טורח לבחון מהן הבעיות מהן סובלות הערים בישראל וכיצד ניתן לפתור אותן בהתבסס על הניסיון הצבור בעולם. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית
תוכנית ויסקונסין: עבודה לעניים או עבודה בעיניים?
במסגרת תכנית וויסקונסין מקבלי הקצבאות מחויבים לבצע תכנית אישית של בין שלושים לארבעים שעות בשבוע, הכוללת הכשרה, חיפוש עבודה, חובת שירות בקהילה ועוד. האם כדאי להמשיך ולהשתמש בה? שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית
רפורמת הבנייה? נתניהו מטעה אתכם
אם ראש הממשלה היה רוצה באמת לייעל את מערכת התכנון, היה עליו לעשות דברים רבים אחרים חוץ מהרפורמה המדוברת, שתוביל לנזק עצום. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית

הכדור(גל) בידיים שלהם
בזכות הפופולאריות העצומה של הכדורגל, השיווק והפרסום האדירים שנלווים לו, ניתן להבין באמצעותו מהו קפיטליזם מודרני: אלה שיש להם כסף, הם שהשרישו את התפיסה שבלי כסף אין כדורגל. הציבור אימץ את החשיבה הזאת בלי לחשוב
כמה מובטלים יש בישראל באמת?
רק כאשר מוסיפים לשיעור המובטלים הרשמי גם את מספרם של אלה אשר התייאשו מחיפוש עבודה ואת המועסקים במשרה חלקית זעומה, מתקבל שיעור האבטלה האמיתי – והגבוה למדי. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית
פתאום כולנו ירוקים?
ההתיירקות, שמטרתה הקניית תדמית ירוקה, הפכה כלי בשירות “האחריות החברתית”, אותה תפיסה שגואלת אותנו מסיוט המהפכה הנדרש מאיתנו. הסתפקותנו באיוולת המהלכים הירוקים הקוסמטיים, היא בעצם בקשת פטור שלנו מהאחריות האמיתית המוטלת עלינו. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית
נתניהו אכן תומך בשתי מדינות לשני עמים
ראש הממשלה, בעזרתו האדיבה של שר האוצר, עושים הכל כדי לבנות מדינה אחת לעניים. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית
כשהכסף מכתיב את צעדי האקדמיה
הראשונים שנפגעים מקפיטליזציית האקדמיה הם המורים מן החוץ והסטודנטים, שהולכים ונתפסים כ”לקוחות” הצורכים מוצר ששמו ידע, במקום לראותם כשותפים לסיעור מוחות. שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית
על תהליכי המסחור והפרטה של מערכת הבריאות
“נאמנותו של הרופא המטפל היא קודם כל כלפי המטופל ובהתאם לכך מחובתו להגן עליו מפני גורמים חיצוניים שיכולים לפגוע בו בריאותית, בין אם מדובר במשטר טוטליטרי, מקום עבודה ואף בני משפחה”. ד”ר נדב דוידוביץ’ מעביר שיעור במכללה החברתית כלכלית על יחסי רופא ומטופל והאינטרסים המשפיעים עליהם
הכלכלה צומחת, האנשים נובלים
“יצאנו מהמשבר!” מריעים מוספי הכלכלה; “חזרנו לצמיחה”. איתמר כהן , מרצה ב’מכללה החברתית כלכלית’ מציג תמונה עגומה של הצמיחה הכלכלית ומתריע מה שטוב לתמ”ג, לא בהכרח טוב לבני האדם המייצרים אותו
מאחורי הקלעים של “ויסות המטבע”
“לכאורה, מדובר בענייני כלכלה סבוכים שעליהם נאבקים מומחים, ולא בשאלה המועלית לדיון ציבורי. אלא שהנושא, הקובע את יחסי הכוחות במשק, אינו יכול להישאר ללא דיון ציבורי, שיתייחס להשלכות החברתיות של כל הכרעה שתתקבל”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית

הרכבת שמזדחלת 36 שנה
ב-1973 הורתה ראש הממשלה דאז, גולדה מאיר, להתחיל לתכנן את הרכבת התחתית כחלק ממערכת להסעת המונים שתקל על הנגישות לת”א. היום ב-2009, אוכלוסיית המדינה גדלה ל-7.4 מיליון תושבים, וכבישיה עמוסים ב-1.9 מיליון כלי רכב פרטיים. היזם הודיע שאין באפשרותו לגייס את הכספים הדרושים ומבקש להגדיל את מענק המדינה. שיעור על רכבת המבוששת להגיע
מה מציעה המדינה לבני נוער בפריפריה?
“השיח הציבורי בישראל אדיש לסוגיית תחולת העוני בקרב ילדים, והצגתו כפועל יוצא של בחירות לא נכונות: נו, מדובר בילדים של משפחות ערביות או חרדיות שמי ביקש מהם ללדת כל-כך הרבה ילדים או בילדים של משפחות גרושות. נו, מי ביקש מהם לפרק את הבית. האפשרות שמספר ילדים הוא פועל יוצא של מדיניות ציבורית בדרך כלל לא נידונה”
הסכנה מאחורי “העוף-על-כל-צלחת”
“ממקומה המקופח משהו בסדר היום הפוליטי, משפיעה תעשיית המזון על חיינו וחייהם של שאר דרי כדור הארץ אולי יותר מכל פעילות כלכלית אחרת. הגידול העולמי בצריכת הבשר משקף למשל, את הצלחתם של בעלי-ההון להכפיף את אורח החיים של בני-אדם לאינטרסים שלהם”. שיעור במכללה החברתית-כלכלית
סופו של הניאו-ליברליזם? לא כל כך מהר
“ניסיון העבר מלמד שהקפיטליזם משנה את צורתו באופן משמעותי רק על רקע משבר אמון עמוק, וממושך, מצד החברה כלפי דרך ניהול הכלכלה. כדי שתתחלף אידיאולוגיה כלכלית שלטת דרושים אירועים מטלטלים וזמן לעכל אותם”. בשיעור ב”מכללה החברתית-כלכלית”, מסביר רמי קפלן שאין למהר ולהספיד את הניאו -ליברליזם
הפרטת הקרקעות, למי היא טובה בעצם?
“אין צורך להיות פרשן משפטי כדי להבין את כוונות הממשלה, האוצר וביבי, שהיו גלויות עוד מתחילת יישום הרפורמה. המטרה שלהם היא להפריט את הקרקע ומהר, ולבטל את ה”מונופול הממשלתי” על הקרקע ועל התכנון במדינה”. דרור רשף שופך אור על התוכנית להפרטת קרקעות, ומסביר למה לא ממש כדאי לעבור לפרברים. שיעור ב”מכללה החברתית כלכלית”
תקציב לא חברתי ולא כלכלי: פשרה צולעת מאד
“פרשנים כלכליים נוהגים לנתח את מסגרת התקציב וסדר העדיפויות שלו. לרוב אין הם עוסקים כלל במה שהיה צריך להיות בתקציב, כביטוי למדיניות הכלכלית-חברתית של הממשלה”. לוי מורב, מרצה במכללה חברתית כלכלית מציג סדרי עדיפויות חלופיים לתקציב המדינה שהתקבל

חוקי או לא? הגבול הדק במרחב האזרחי האפור
“הזכות להחליט מה חוקי ואינו חוקי נתונה בידי הריבון. זכות שנועדה לקדם את הטוב המשותף, להגן על הפרט ורכושו, ולהבטיח התנהלות תקינה של החברה. כדי למנוע מצבים של עריצות הריבון או הרוב, על החוק להבטיח את החלתו על כל האזרחים באופן שווה, ללא הבדל של מין, גזע, ודת”. מה ניתן לעשות כדי לצמצם מצבים בהם ההתנהלות אינה תקינה?

שלא תגידו שלא הזהירו אתכם
“ניצחון אשליית האופטימיות התקיים באסון התאומים, בערב מלחמת יום כיפור, ודוגמאות נוספות בהיסטוריה קיימות עד לעת העתיקה. כך אנו עומדים כיום מול תהום פעורה, בה דווקא האמצעים שננקטו לחלצנו מהמשבר עתידים לגרור את העולם כולו לתוכה, ונשאלת השאלה – האם הכלכלנים לא יודעים זאת? התשובה המפתיעה היא שהם יודעים”
כיצד הפכה המדינה אחראית לשביתות בפריפריה?
סקירה הסטורית, תוך שימוש במקרה הדוגמא של אופקים, מסבירה ד”ר שני בר-און מ”המכללה החברתית כלכלית” מהי “שביתת סגירה”, כיצד צלחה חמישה עשורים והצליחה לפעול גם הפעם, במפעל “פרי גליל”
שוק חופשי בישראל – סיפור של הקצנה
“ביולי 1985 הכריזו על תוכנית ייצוב המשק. זאת, לאחר אינפלציה מתמשכת, שהגיעה לשיא של 445% לשנה בין דצמבר 1983 לדצמבר 1984. כל מה שקורה במשק הישראלי מתוכנית ייצוב המשק ואילך יכול להיתפס כתגובת פוסט-טראומה – שימוש בתרופת השוק החופשי לריפוי האינפלציה, עד למינון יתר”
סדר עולמי חדש
“קריסתה של וול-סטריט; החלשותו של הדולר; והחובות העצומים של ארה”ב, מצביעים כולם על כך שההגמוניה המוחלטת – הכלכלית, הפוליטית והתרבותית – ממנה נהנה השריף האמריקאי מאז תום המלחמה הקרה, עומדת להסתיים. עופר סיטבון מציג את סופו של העידן החד-מעצמתי
זהירות! הקאמבק של המשטר הפיאודלי
התלות ההולכת ומתעצמת של הפוליטיקה בהון גורמת לרעיון הדמוקרטי לאבד מתוקפו. האם הפיאודליזם ממלא את הקליפה הרעיונית שהתרוקנה? ישי גבריאלי תוהה האם אין ברירה אלא להיכנע ל”ניאו-פיאודליזם” המאיים להחליף את הדמוקרטיה
סין והגלובליזציה – שינוי סדרי עולם?
הפיכתה של סין למעצמה מוכיחה כי מדינות אשר ‘משחקות’ נכון במשחק הגלובלי – מנצחות. היא שינתה את מאזן הכוחות העולמי, והתחזקות הכלכלה הסינית מספקת השראה למדינות נוספות דוגמת הודו. עם פתיחת השנה האולימפית, ד”ר יורי פינס סוקר את התמורות הכלכליות-חברתיות בסין. חלקו השני של השיעור
דברי הימים של הגלובליזציה הסינית
מקורבן של הגלובליזציה בשנות החמישים, בעשור האחרון סין הפכה לשחקנית מרכזית בתהליך. ההתנגדות לקפיטליזם הומרה באימוץ כללי המשחק המערביים – ובשינוי מאזן הכוחות העולמי. עם פתיחת השנה האולימפית, ד”ר יורי פינס סוקר את התמורות הכלכליות-חברתיות בסין. חלקו הראשון של השיעור
לאן נעלמו עודפי התקציב?
בין 2004 ל-2007 לא חלו שינויים משמעותיים בצמיחה המוגברת של המשק הישראלי: ההכנסות ממסים עוקפות את התחזיות, הכלכלה ספגה את הוצאות ההתנתקות והמלחמה בלבנון והקיצוץ בתקציבי הממשלה נמשך. יואב ריבק ויאיר טרצ’יצקי מסבירים מדוע חרף השגשוג – האוצר דורש להקטין גם את תקציב 2008
האם כדאי להפריט את התכנון בישראל?
תכנון הסביבה הבנויה איננו עניין של מה בכך, ויש קשר הדוק בין התדרדרות החברה לאסון האקולוגי העומד לפתחנו. האם לא הגיע הזמן להפסיק להסתמך על השלטונות ש’יסדרו’ את מרחב המחייה שלנו – ולהעביר את התכנון לידיים פרטיות? פרופ’ יוברט לו-יון מסביר מדוע עלינו לקחת חזקה על עיצוב פני הארץ שלנו
תחבורה ציבורית – לבעלי מכוניות
כיום, עלינו להכיר בכך שהמפתח לקידום מערכת תחבורה יעילה הוא שימוש בתחבורה הציבורית כתחליף מועדף לרכב הפרטי. פרופ’ דוד מהלאל מסביר מדוע הצלחתה של התחבורה הציבורית תימדד על-פי מספר האנשים שבחרו בה – ולא בנסיעה במכונית
נטישת הערים ופיתוח בר-קיימא בישראל
ניתוח של תקציב המדינה מראה כי בעקיפין, אולי אף מבלי משים, ישראל ממשיכה להחליש את עריהָ. בשבע השנים האחרונות, תקציב הבנייה במגזר הכפרי היה גבוה פי חמישה מתקציב חיזוק הערים. נגה לבציון-נדן תוהה מדוע הממשלה, שהביעה לא אחת את רצונה לחזק את הערים ולעבותן – עושה בדיוק את ההפך

היגורו אוכלוסייה ותעשייה יחדיו?
נוכח משבר הסביבה, התעשייה והאוכלוסייה מחויבות לחיות אחת עם השנייה. כל אפשרות אחרת אינה מתקבלת על הדעת – והיא מהווה מאמץ מודע להסוות את גורמי הסיכון. ליעד אורתר מסביר מדוע עיר הבה”דים מספקת הזדמנות לתקן את טעויות העבר
דברי הימים של הגלובליזציה
האם העידן הגלובלי החל לאחר מלחמת העולם השנייה? אולי עם ראשיתה של המהפכה התעשייתית? ושמא התפשטות האנושות מיבשת אפריקה ליתר העולם היתה המאורע הגלובלי הראשון? ד”ר דייגו אולשטיין נותן סימנים בגישות ההיסטוריות לגלובליזציה
מבט על משברי החינוך העברי
רבים מתגעגעים לזמנים טובים יותר, לשנים בהן מערכת החינוך התנהלה על מי מנוחות והמורים היו בעלי שיעור קומה – ולעידנים נטולי שביתות. אולם למעשה, את החינוך היהודי באירופה ואת החינוך העברי במדינה שבדרך ובישראל פקדו לא מעט משברים. דבורה קלקין-פישמן סוקרת מאה שנה של עימותים לא-חינוכיים
מבט על משברי החינוך העברי – חלק ב’
למרות שהמשברים במערכת החינוך כרוכים פעמים רבות במאבק על שכר המורים – אין זהו המוקד העיקרי שלהם. מטבע עיסוקם, למורים יש תפיסה מגובשת של משימותיהם, וקולותיהם של המורָה ושל המורֶה חייבים להישמע. דבורה קלקין-פישמן סוקרת 100 שנה של עימותים לא-חינוכיים. חלקו השני של השיעור
הפקעת הזכויות החברתיות בישראל
ככל שישראל הופכת קפיטליסטית יותר, מתעצם הכרסום בזכויות החברתיות-כלכליות של אזרחיה. בהיעדר חוקה, זכות השביתה, הזכות לחינוך ולדיור וזכויות נוספות הולכות ונעלמות. ד”ר אפרים דוידי מאמין שמאבק חברתי ישיב את הזכויות שהופקעו מאיתנו

אחריות חברתית ומקרה בית הקפה
יש הטוענים שה’אחריות החברתית’, אופנה מחייבת בקרב בעלי עסקים והאלפיון העליון, היא מצג שווא – ויש הסוברים שצריך לאפשר להון להוכיח את רצינות כוונותיו. פרופ’ דני גוטוויין מודיע שהזדמנות כזו הגיעה, והיא מוטלת לפתחה של עפרה שטראוס

התיאומוניטריזם – דת הכסף
הכלכלה היא דת המצווה על קידוש ערכים וחפצים בצורה עיוורת, ומגלה מעט מאוד כבוד ופחות מכך סובלנות לגויים שבשמה לא קראו לממלכות שאותה לא ידעו. דת, שמבלי שנזהה ונגדיר אותה ככזו, הפכה ב-50 השנים האחרונות לדתו הרשמית של העולם. ישי גבריאלי מציג את דת התאומוניטריזם והשפעותיה ההרסניות
גוויעת הדיור הציבורי בישראל
כמה אנשים משלמים יותר מ-50% מהכנסתם על דיור? היכן הם מתגוררים? כמה מהם חיים בתנאים לא ראויים? כמה דירות למעוטי הכנסה צריכות הרשויות המקומיות לספק מדי שנה בכדי לענות על צורכי האוכלוסייה? איננו יודעים. ד”ר אמילי סילברמן מתארת את ההתכווצות הדרמטית של הזכות לדיור בישראל

כך הפכה ישראל למעצמת צריכה
בעשור האחרון הצטמצם מרחב הבחירה של הפרט ונבלע על-ידי פרסומאים, משווקים וקמעונאים. בהיעדר פיקוח על המנגנונים המקדמים את הצמיחה, כוחות השוק מגדילים את השפעתם על הצרכן כמעט ללא הפרעה. אורלי רונן מתארת איך הפכנו לעוד גלגל במכונת הצריכה – ללא ההגנה שהמדינה אמורה לספק לנו

קורבנות הסחר בבני אדם בישראל
הגיעה העת כי הרשויות יפנימו שלסחר בבני אדם יש יותר מצורה אחת. לא רק נשים הנסחרות לישראל הן קורבנותיו: יש כאן סחר פנים בנשים ישראליות, סחר באיברים, עבדות משקי בית ותבניות רבות נוספות של עבודות כפייה. נעמי לבנקרון מזכירה כי זכויות האדם של אנשים רבים, רבים מדי, עדיין מופקרות בישראל
תולדות המאבק בסחר בנשים בישראל
בין השנים 2001 ל-2007 השתנה הסחר בנשים בישראל: החוק מחמיר יותר עם העבריינים, טיפול המשטרה בקורבנות ובסוחרים התייעל, עבודתם של ארגוני הסיוע התמקצעה – וגם הסרסורים והנשים הנסחרות עצמן מודעים לכללי המשחק החדשים. ריטה חייקין מתארת את ההתמודדות עם התופעה בעשור האחרון
הימין החברתי והתנועה הקיבוצית
נפגעי השתלטות אידיאולוגיית הימין החברתי על בית התנועה הקיבוצית אינם רק חברי הקבוצות החלשות ביותר, אלא אף אנשי השורה. זוהי רק ההתחלה, ואם נמשיך לדבוק ברעיונות ההפרטה והשוק החופשי ממדי העוני והפערים בקיבוצים יגדלו במהירות. דורון נדיב תוהה: האם המהפכה תתמיד – או שהמגמה תשתנה?

ניאו-ליברליזם והמקרה של אחות ביה”ס
דחיית העתירה שהוגשה לבג”ץ נגד החלטת משרד החינוך לבטל את מוסד אחות בית הספר, ולהחליפה במערך ייעודי של מד”א, עברה ללא רעש ציבורי גדול. וחבל שכך. עופר סיטבון מסביר שאין די במאבק משפטי נגד מהלך ההפרטה – וכי הפיתרון הוא שינוי עמוק בתפיסה המעמידה מעל לכל את היעילות והחיסכון הכלכלי

הפוליטיזציה של הארכיאולוגיה בי-ם
כנציגי גישה אקדמית וחילונית, הארכיאולוגים החופרים בירושלים מוצאים עצמם בעמדה ייחודית: הכשרתם דורשת מהם להתנהל באופן חסר פניות; בעוד יזמי החפירות – פקידי ציבור, גופי פיתוח, מממנים ותעשיית התיירות – מצפים לתוצאות שיאששו את תפיסותיהם. רפי גרינברג על ארכיאולוגיה בשירות האידיאולוגיה

תולדות המאבק באנטנות הסלולריות
חברות הסלולר מצמצמות את המאבק באנטנות לשורה תחתונה אחת: תשתית חיונית מול היסטריית המונים; בעוד פעילי “הפורום לסלולריות שפויה” מתעקשים על שורה אחרת לגמרי: התנהלות כוחנית מול אזרחים חסרי זכויות שבריאותם מופקרת – והיעדר כוחות ממלכתיים מרסנים. אבי דבוש מגיש משל חברתי אקטואלי
המתקפה החזיתית על החינוך הממלכתי
מערכת החינוך הממלכתית בישראל הולכת ומידלדלת, ואוכלוסיות שלמות מייצרות לה אלטרנטיבות הנשענות על תקציבי מדינה. החרדים מכיוון אחד, האוכלוסיות החזקות מהשני והמגזר הערבי מהשלישי, נוגסים במערכת ומתרחקים ממנה. ניר מיכאלי מסביר כיצד הפך החינוך לקורבן של תהליכים חברתיים וכלכליים עמוקים
ארבע הערות על הסכם הפנסיה החדש
בחודש יולי חתמו ההסתדרות, בשם העובדים שאינם חברים בה, ולשכת התיאום של הארגונים הכלכליים, בשם המעסיקים הקטנים שאינם יכולים להתנגד להחלטותיה, על הסכם פנסיה לשכירים במגזר העסקי. דן שפרינצק מסביר מדוע שני הגופים כרתו ביניהם הסכם שלא מחייב אותם – מצגת שווא שנכפתה על צד שלישי
תיקון העולם של התנועה הסביבתית
הסיפור הסביבתי מסופר אמנם כרשימה קודרת של איומים, אך יש לו גם צד אחר, המספק תקווה. התנועה הסביבתית בישראל היא חלק מתנועה עולמית מתרחבת שמקיפה מגוון כוחות. המסר הבסיסי שלה הוא שאיננו נידונים לאסון: הכדור אכן בידינו. ד”ר דב חנין מתעקש שלבני האדם יש יכולות עצומות – וגם נכונות לשנות
איטליה כמודל לפריחת הקואופרטיבים
דרכם של האיטלקים לטפל בבעיות חברתיות מרתקת, ויש ללמוד מהם על צמיחת הקואופרטיבים הסוציאליים. עלינו ללמוד גם על החקיקה וההקלות במיסוי המעודדות את פריחת הקואופרציה, ולקדם חקיקה מקבילה בנושא. אילנה לפידות מסבירה מה גורם להצלחת הקואופרטיבים באירופה – לעומת פירוקם במקומותינו
תקציב 2008 – אותן הזמירות והגזירות
דבריו הריקים של שר האוצר הנוכחי, שלקראת הדיונים על תקציב 2008 קבע כי “השווקים מצפים מאיתנו להמשיך במדיניות צמיחה כדי לקדם את הכלכלה ולטיפול בבעיות החברתיות”, לא יכולים אלא להעלות חיוך מר. לוי מורב תוהה: אם זה המצב, מדוע שלא נמנה את השווקים לתפקיד שר האוצר ונגיד הבנק המרכזי?
עבדות מודרנית בעולם ובישראל
בעוד שבעבר העבדות והסחר בבני אדם היו גלויים וחוקיים, בימינו הם הוצאו מהחוק ונעלמו מהשיח הציבורי. אולם מתברר כי במאה ה-21 העבדות היא עסק רווחי, ייתכן שרווחי מאי פעם. אלה קרן מסבירה מדוע העבדות בת זמננו מוסווית ומתעתעת – וכיצד היא משגשגת בחסות הכלכלה החופשית-לכאורה. שיעור שני בנושא

טקסט

You want private health services? Take a good look at Hadassah first

מנכ”ל המכללה, רמי הוד, על מה שועדת גרמן צריכה ללמוד ממשבר בית החולים הדסה.פורסם בהארץ, 09.02.2014″ערב טוב יאיר, זאת יעל. המשבר בהדסה מדיר שינה מעיני. אני יודעת שהמלצות הועדה בראשותי על החלת שר”פ בבתי החולים הציבוריים אמורה להצטרף לרשימת ההישגים שהבאנו למעמד הביניים. שזו הדרך שלנו לאפשר לו טיפול טוב יותר מבלי להגדיל את התקציב. אבל בפוליטיקה החדשה צריך לומר את האמת: אם מוסד שמגלגל 250 מיליון שקל משר”פ ו-78 מיליון מתיירות רפואית עומד לקרוס, כנראה שהשוק לא יודע לנהל את עצמו. אם השר”פ מאפשר ביצוע של ניתוחים פרטיים בבוקר, על חשבון זמן ציבורי, ומעוות את מערכת השכר, כנראה שפיקוח לא יעבוד. לכן, אני סבורה שאנו צריכים לשנות כיוון. לא אשא על מצפוני שבתקופת כהונתי יונהג שר”פ, שזמן ההמתנה של אלו שאינם משלמים יהיה פי 13.5 מאלו שמשלמים, כמו בהדסה. לכן, אני מתכוונת לכנס את הוועדה שבראשותי ולהוריד את אופציית השר”פ מעל שולחנה. את מערכת הבריאות נתקן על-ידי השקעה ממשלתית ברפואה הציבורית ויצירת חיץ בינה לבין הפרטית”.שיחה כזאת בין שרת הבריאות לשר האוצר לא התקיימה במוצ”ש, לאחר שהמדינה החליטה להזרים 50 מיליון שקלים להדסה. היא לא התקיימה משום שעל אף שהמסקנות מהמשבר בהדסה ברורות כמו גם דעות המומחים המתריעות מפני ההשלכות ההרסניות של השר”פ, ההחלטה הצפויה של ועדת גרמן על שר”פ – מרוכך, מפוקח, זה בכל מקרה טיפול רפואי תמורת כסף פרטי – היא החלטה פוליטית. השר”פ הוא פתרון שנרקח במיוחד עבור מעמד הביניים. העניים יסבלו ממנו, העשירים כבר מזמן במערכת הפרטית, ורק מעמד הביניים נמצא בין הפטיש לסדן, בין ההזדקקות שלו כמעמד נשחק למערכת ציבורית חינמית ואיכותית לבין רצונו להשתמש במעט הכסף שעוד נותר לו כדי לא לחכות בתור חודשים כמו העניים.תפקידו הפוליטי של השר”פ הוא ליישב את הסתירה בין הבטחת הממשלה לשפר את חייו של מעמד הביניים לבין המשך מדיניותה השוחקת אותו, כמו למשל ההחלטה לשנות את הכלל הפיסיקלי ובכך לגרוע בשנת 2015 שישה מיליארד שקלים מההוצאה הציבורית, מה שמבטיח את המשך שחיקת תקציב הבריאות. מצב זה, בו מחריף הפער בין ציפיותיו של מעמד הביניים לבין מה שהוא מקבל מהמדינה, גרם בקיץ 2011 למאות אלפי הורים לדרוש חינוך חינם מגיל 3 – ולנצח.תסריט דומה יכול לחזור על עצמו בתחום הבריאות. אל מול האפשרות של שיקום הרפואה הציבורית, תציע ועדת גרמן למעמד הביניים עיסקה: האפשרות לבחור רופא בתשלום בבתי החולים הציבוריים תסלול עבורו נתיב פרטי-ציבורי זול יותר מאשר זה שקיים באסותא, ובתמורה הוא יישאר אדיש לשחיקת תקציב הבריאות ולהרס המערכת הציבורית. אלו, כך אומרת לו הממשלה באמצעות השר”פ, הם הבעיות של העניים. עיסקה אפילה זו תגרום לתסריט ידוע מראש: גובה הביטוח המשלים שנאלץ מעמד הביניים לשלם יוכפל, הוצאותיו על בריאות ינסקו, וההכנסה הפנויה שלו תרד. תחושת החופש להשתדרג באמצעות תשלום נוסף תתברר עם הזמן כאשליה ממכרת, בדיוק כפי שקורה במערכת החינוך, בשוק הפנסיה המופרט, ובשוק העבודה עם הפגיעה בעבודה המאורגנת.בשלוש הזירות הללו מעמד הביניים ראה בהפרטה דרך לשדרוג מעמדו ולשחרור כבליו מהמדינה, ושלושתן חוללו את התהליך שהפך אותו למעמד שחוק ועני יותר. נותרו עוד כמה שבועות עד שועדת גרמן תקבל את החלטותיה. בזמן זה יכול עדיין מעמד הביניים להתעורר. עליו ללמוד את הלקח משני עשורים של הפרטה ששחקו את בטחונו החברתי ודחקו אותו לשולי העוני. אם אלו אינם מספיקים, מופיעים המחדלים בהדסה ומוכיחים מה קורה כששירות רפואי הופך לסחורה.על מעמד הביניים לראות בכוונה להנהיג שר”פ מתקפה על המעוז האחרון של מדינת הרווחה ולסרב לעסקה המסוכנת שמציעה לו הממשלה. מזור למצוקותיו אינו מצוי בפתרונות סקטוריאליים המבוססים על כסף שכבר אין לו, אלא בשינוי המדיניות הממשלתית מהפרטת מערכת הבריאות להלאמה שלה. הכותב הוא מנכ”ל המכללה החברתית-כלכליתArticle by Rami Hod, Sea’s Executive Director

Originally published in Haaretz, 9.2.2014

“Good evening Finance Minister Yair Lapid, it’s Health Minister Yael German. I haven’t slept a wink since the Hadassah crisis broke out. I know my committee’s recommendations regarding the introduction of Private Medical Services (PMS) in public hospitals were meant to be part of the success we registered for the middle class – our way to give it better care without increasing the budget. But now we are in the era of ‘new politics’, and the truth must be told: If an institution which rakes in 250 million shekels (~$71 million) from private medical services and 78 million (~$21 million) from medical tourism is financially buckling over, then apparently the market can’t run itself.

“If PMS allows privately-funded operations to take up public time in the hospital during the morning hours, all the while distorting the wage system, regulation won’t work. Therefore, I think we must change course. My conscience will not allow PMS to be enacted on my watch, so that waiting times for non-paying patients will be 13.5 fold that of paying patients, like is the case in Hadassah. Therefore, I intend to convene the committee I head and put forth a motion to reject the PMS bid. The ailing health system will thus be fixed by State investment in public medical services and by make sure it is kept segregated from the private health system.”

This fictional conversation between Health Minister Yael German and Finance Minister Yair Lapid didn’t take place after the State decided to divert some 50 million shekels to Hadassah on Saturday. The clear conclusion from the Hadassah crisis is clear, and echoes those foreseen by experts who warned against the destructive repercussions of PMS. But the bottom line is that the German Committee’s expected decision over PMS – the watered down, reduced and regulated version, is still medical care in return private funds, and is thus a political decision. The PMS was a solution custom made for the middle class. The poor will suffer from it, the rich are already paying for medical care, and only the middle class is footing the bill – stuck between a rock and a hard place, between the erosion of its financial status – which leads to a need in free public healthcare – and its desire to use what little money it has to avoid the months-long queue the poor are forced to endure.

The political role of PMS is to solve the contradiction between the current government’s promise to improve quality of living for its middle class voters, and the attempt to to maintain the policy which erodes it – like the decision to change fiscal rules and reduce public spending for 2015 by six billion shekels (~$1.6 billion), ensuring the continued dilution of the health budget. The growing rift between the middle class’ expectations and what it actually gets from the State led hundreds of thousands of parents in the summer of 2011 to demand free education from the age of three – and actually get it in a landmark concession from the government. This scenario may repeat itself in the health system. Facing the possibility of rehabilitating the public health system, the German Committee will offer the middle class a compromise: choose a doctor for a fee at public hospitals, through a cheaper private-public package, and in return, the middle class will remain indifferent to the erosion of the health budget. The ramifications of the destruction of the public health system, the government tells the middle class with the help of the PMS, are the poor’s problem.

The shady deal will bring about a well-known scenario: The supplementary insurance cost the middle class is already paying will be double, its health expenditures will shoot through the roof, and its liquid income will plummet. The freedom to upgrade your health service package for an additional fee will eventually be exposed as an addictive illusion, the same as was in the case of education system, the privatization of pension funds, the assault on organized labor in the labor market. In these three fields the middle class viewed privatizations as a way of upgrading their status and removing the shackles binding them to the State, but these only eroded their status and impoverished them even more.

There are still a few weeks before the German Committee has makes its decision. There is still enough time for the middle class to wake up. It must learn the lesson of the privatizations of the past two decades, which eroded their social safety net and pushed them to the brink of poverty. If all this is not enough, the Hadassah crisis is also example of the ramifications of turning medical care into a commodity. The middle class must see the desire to enact PMS as an attack on the last bulwark of the welfare state and thus refuse the government’s dangerous proposal. The cure for the middle class’ ailments is not in sectoral solutions based on money it no longer possess, but by stopping the government from embracing a policy of privatizing the health system, opting instead to strengthen it.

New scholarship program for economic students has opened

Progressive Economists is the only program of its kind in Israel that educates and trains economists to re-address social issues through economics studies. It’s mission is to develop new economic leadership by training young economists and update economic thinking to encouraging them to develop new ideas and enter into carriers of meaningful change.

1959353_1582221625339545_7870948299069196914_n

35 outstanding economics students from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University and Haifa University receive scholarships from SEA. Their intensive training includes weekly courses on progressive trends in economics to give an emphasis on social impacts on individuals, families and communities. These are given by prominent scholars and government officials. Bolstered by internships in national and local government. The internship provides students with a window into real world economics and encourages them to develop a career in public service and create a change from within.

ipp

Our goal is that a significant number of student leaders move on to meaningful careers in the public service and will lead change in social and economic policy. Others will pursue doctoral degrees at Israeli and internationally renowned universities. We believe the program’s alumni will be tomorrow’s leading economists and decision-makers.

Socially oriented Israeli geeks try to change ‘Darwinist’ spirit of start-up nation

Frustration felt by Israeli social activists over their inability to alter government policy has led to numerous initiatives aimed at changing the world from the ground up. The frustration felt by Israeli social activists over their inability to alter government policy has led to numerous initiatives aimed at changing the world from the ground up, like cooperatives and new companies owned by workers or consumers. One of the more fascinating of these endeavors is Carmel, a programing cooperative that is challenging one of Israeli capitalism’s main sources of pride: the high-tech industry.

The founders of the Haifa-based cooperative, which was launched in August and is currently in the final stages of the registration process, are four high-tech journeymen who are also social activists. Noam Levy, 36, and Carmel Neta, 28, are active in the Democratic Workers Organization; Yosef Baruch, 38, was a leader of the Hazit Hatzfonit (Northern Front) group during the social protests; and Idan Kaminer, 42, is an activist in public broadcasting.

Met in protest tent Nothing that can be found in their office, located on the sixth floor of a building in Haifa’s hiCenter high-tech park, hints at what their company was founded to do. The generic glass doors, whiteboards and programming books don’t give anything away. “Noam and I met when we studied computer science together,” says Baruch, who was unanimously voted CEO of the company. “During the protests of 2011, I came to the tents in Haifa to see what was going on. I saw smoke, heard drums and people screaming ‘the people demand social justice,’ but didn’t know what to think of it. Only when I saw Noam did I realize that there were serious people there, and it was worthwhile to sit down and talk. I sat down, and didn’t move from there for two years.”

Carmel employees say that not everything that glitters is gold in the startup nation. “The approach to high-tech is very Darwinist,” says Levy. “It used to be at Microsoft that the worst 5 percent would be sent home. There’s the well-known limit at age 40, after which you’re overqualified and the amount of positions open to you is very small, because you only need so many managers and department heads.” “High-tech is a cruel world, unlike any other,” adds Baruch. “And startups are the cruelest. They expect the employees to work for free, but only one in 10 startups succeeds. You’ve got an expiration date, and it will come much sooner than you’ll reach retirement age. Even if I’m on a secure management path, some 25-year-old accountant can decide to cut the cost of my salary with one cold-hearted decision.” According to Baruch, “Management flexibility is mostly an excuse to fire people over a certain age. The high-tech market in Israel has not reached its human potential because it’s mired in ageist thinking. The industry is training new programmers, even though there are programmers over the age of 50 who are willing to work for low pay.”

The idea to conduct their company differently came up during a course on cooperatives at the Social Economic Academy. Weeks before the course, Medingo, where Levy was employed, was sold for $160 million to the Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche and had to close. He saw something absurd in the situation. “The company I worked for had to close because it was successful. Medingo was a very successful place, and it was actually the success that made it break up. Isn’t that stupid?” he notes. “We thought about whether we should go in as employees in the industry or try to start something new − and we went with something new,” Levy continues. “Since we decided to work together, each one of us has received at least two job offers.” The most important thing is making social action part of life, they say. “I don’t like social action that’s totally disconnected from politics,” says Neta.

“No evenings-only social action, or Saturday night protests. The only way to make real change is through the workforce and the economy. Currently, our company is building an information system for a big university, and other companies’ websites, with the goal of generating initial income. For the future, our cooperative is planning to develop an agricultural product.” In the meantime, the members are trying to formulate rules for the cooperative. They’d like to see all the employees join them as members of the cooperative, including maintenance workers. Also, the highest salary won’t be more than five times the lowest salary, in the worst-case scenario. In the meantime, the four partners have equal salaries.

“Rules sound technical, but it’s a declaration of intent as to how this place should function,” says Baruch enthusiastically. “We’re making breakthroughs into uncharted territory, trying to forge a new path, to have people follow our lead and take responsibility. The cooperative rules are also about mutual responsibility, for all the workers. If the ship hits a storm, we won’t start to throw sailors overboard. We’ll tighten our belts and make decisions together. Layoffs will be a last resort. All the workers will make decisions together.” The work hours are also convenient in relation to the industry: four days a week, eight hours a day. “The high-tech stereotype, that it’s a place to make quick, easy money, then run away, seeps into the workplace. A high-tech employee who works 12 hours is doing something wrong. He won’t be able to do that for years on end, and will break at some point,” says Baruch. A whiteboard in the office displays the hours that employees can’t work, like the times when Levy has to take his children to school. Programming cooperatives have already sprung up in London and California. In September, another programming cooperative called Permatech was launched in Israel, bringing freelancers together to work in a loosely cooperative framework. Permatech created the Kifaya system to report racism, which was initiated by the Agenda organization

. “We want as many socially oriented programs as we can find, and we give discounts to charitable organizations,” said Tailor Vijay, one of the Permatech founders, who said his cooperative has a waiting list of 100 programmers. ‘Quality products, too’ “It’s natural that people with skill and education would prefer to work on their own, without having people make profit at the expense of their talents,” says attorney Yifat Solel, who consults for both cooperatives. “These cooperatives are trying to bring sanity back to high-tech work, to set reasonable hours and a fair salary. This creates not only a pleasant, equal workplace, but quality products.” “We decided to work from an office, so that the work would be taken seriously,” says Baruch. “You get up in the morning, go to work and clock in. It’s like a factory. I don’t want people to see our project as a social club. We’re just like Egged drivers who worked in a cooperative − we want to be the Egged of Israeli high-tech.” Asked to describe reactions from the rest of the Israeli high-tech world, Levy says they vary. “I’ve gotten skeptical looks from many people − they didn’t know what to make of us. We got good reactions from workers, though.”

Dr. Yifat Reuveni

Dr. Yifat Reuveni directs the social finance innovation activity at the JDC Institute for Leadership and Governance, where she is responsible on the R&D and Implementation of social finance models. She is also responsible on enhancing the entrepreneurial and social finance eco-system building in Israel in order to sustain regulation and deal flows for impact investments. Dr. Reuveni teaches BA and MBA courses in social finance, social and profitable entrepreneurship, and alternative economic models at the Coller Business School, Tel Aviv University, Karunya school of management, Kerala, India and at the College of management business school, and is beneficiary of several EU grants such as Marie Curie (FAB‐MOVE) and Erasmus + CLEVER. Until 2014, she was the head of the Recanati Business School’s Development and International Relations Unit. She completed a B.A. in Economics and Philosophy and an M.A. in Communication Technologies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and a Ph.D. on the evolving of the new economy at McGill University, Montreal, Canada, focusing on the high-tech industries in North America and Europe. As a recipient of a Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) scholarship she participated in the McGill Program for Economic and Social Rights, working with the Mohawk people (first nation) in Kahnawake, Canada, and writing an assessment report of business opportunities in the Mohawk community (the KANATA 2000 Report).  Prior to her time spent in Canada Yifat worked for five years with the Association for Human Rights in Israel as director of the consulting department, working with security forces and public service leaders. She has given courses on the new economy and the neo-liberal economy at the Recanati Business School, Colman Business school and Ben-Gurion University’s School of Business and Management. She mentors entrepreneurs from around the world as part of the Pears Program for Innovation and International Development, is involved in numerous initiatives in Israel to promote technological innovation and social entrepreneurship, and has acted as a judge for several enterprise pitching competitions. Her current academic activities consist of participation in an international research group on social entrepreneurship at the Center for Social Economy at the Liege HEC Business School, focusing on alternative finance models as the finance infrastructure for such entrepreneurship, acting as social and sustainable finance board member at OXFORD, writing social-finance case studies and leading two Israeli research groups in Tel-Aviv University and in the college of management business school.   

Ran Livne